Film tagged posts

Film Like A Pro

Are you a budding Hitchcock or a wannabe Spielberg but have never had the money to make your very own film? Well, now there is no excuse as it has never been easier to grab a camera and create your very own Oscar worthy cinematic masterpiece. Films like The Blair Witch Project and Paranormal Activity have shown just how easy it is to create a fantastic low budget movie that can be a huge global success in its own right. So, if you’re a budding filmmaker, or just a newbie filming enthusiast, there are a few simple tips you can follow to make sure you get the most professional looking work out of your low cost equipment.

Getting the right equipment together for your film shoot can be not only tricky, but expensive too. However, if you are looking to use the same state of the art camera and lights that they use in Hollywood, but you’re looking for a more authentic, low key look for your film there are plenty of low budget cameras available on the market that can do the job well. When you’re shooting your film always remember that the narrative and acting are two of the most important things to get right if you want to make a good impression. You can be forgiven for the quality of your shots if the story is well told and you have good enough actors to pull it off.

Once you’ve got all the shots you want in the can, it’s time to edit together your film and add those finishing touches to complete your movie. Things like transitions, a title sequence and music can all be added at this stage, and you can also move around scenes to make sure you get your masterpiece just the way you want it. If you really want to give your film the professional edge add some credits to the end and make up an official film company logo which you can reuse again and again on your work.

Most new computers will have some sort of in built film editing software for you to use but if you really want to splash out you can opt to buy a specific editing programme so you can give your movies the professional touch. With these programmes you can add colour to your film and you will find a greater range of cutting and editing tools than a run of the mill programmes you can get for free.

Whether you are shooting your film on a small hd camcorder or you are taking out a loan to hire some top class equipment, creating a film you can be proud of takes determination, skill and a lot of creativity, no matter what kind of tools you are using. So if you are keen to put your film skills to good use, grab a low budget camera and get shooting, and you could be collecting that Bafta in no time.

Paul Buchanan writes for a digital marketing agency. This article has been commissioned by a client of said agency. This article is not designed to promote, but should be considered professional content.

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Nice Film photos

Check out these film images:

October Film color
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Image by Makena G
HIIIIII OMG so this is filmmmmm isn’t that cool? (ps this shot is from this day

It turned out really amazing. Out of a roll of 24 i only really like 5 but i guess 10 turned out good.

check out the other 2 i uploaded. 🙂

This is my favorite out of the roll of 24.

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Image by shinealight
A non-digital photo for today! Playing around with the Minolta XD-11 a few months ago. I’ll post another one I like tomorrow.

Films
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Image by Arenamontanus
Finally a movie about poking oneself in the ear!

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Film Maker Sriram Raghavan

Film-maker Sriram Raghavan has managed to earn a cult following through his two remarkable Bollywood suspense thrillers EK HASINA THI (2004) and JOHNNY GADDAAR (2007).

Early Life

As a kid, Sriram used to beg, borrow and steal to watch movies, particularly of film-makers like Manmohan Desai, Nasir Hussain, Vijay Anand and Alfred Hitchcock, and munched on a lot of James Headly Chase novels along; his popcorn. Suspense thriller was his genre and to-be-forte.

Sriram, a Tamilian originally from Pune, finished college and came to Mumbai to pursue a career in journalism. He got a job in Stardust magazine, but he wasn’t good at it. So he decided to join the Film and Television Institute of India, Pune for a course in direction.

Later, he made a 45-minute gripping documentary, ‘Raman Raghav’, on the most infamous Indian serial killer, Raman Raghav. It starred noted stage-film actor Raghuvir Yadav in the lead.

Sriram happened to meet director Ram Gopal Varma after the release of SATYA (1998). Varma asked him to write something and show him. Sriram carried the VHS of ‘Raman Raghav’ and showed him. Varma loved Sriram’s documentary and soon decided to offer him a script.

Ram Gopal Varma showed the script of Ek Hasina Thi by Pooja Ladha Surti to Sriram. The script had a woman as the protagonist which Sriram found very exciting. And, hence agreed to direct it.

Career

Sriram debuted with EK HASINA THI in the year 2004. Starring Saif Ali Khan and Urmila Matondkar in the lead, the film was a dark-yet-not-grim psychological thriller, which was co-written by Sriram and produced by Ram Gopal Varma.
Ek Hasina Thi stunned the audiences with its amazing storyline and brilliant direction. Urmila’s performance earned her a Filmfare nomination for the Best Actress. The film received rave reviews from critics and has become a cult film among thriller lovers.

His next directorial was JOHNNY GADDAAR (2007). It’s story revolved around a gang of five men, the eldest (Dharmendra) over 60, the youngest (Neil Nitin Mukesh, his debut) in his twenties, who faced the bright prospect of making a fortune through what seemed to be a simple exchange of contraband for money on a train. However, this caper goes wrong badly. What follows is a ruthless search for the traitor amongst them. The film, upon release, underperformed at the ticket window, but it was one of the most positively reviewed films of the year. It was applauded for its soundtrack, camerawork and editing. The film gained immense following for its 60s-70s style thriller-film noir. With this film, Sriram Raghavan had become amongst the most reputed film-makers to work with.

Upcoming Films

Sriram would be coming up with yet another suspense thriller, AGENT VINOD, with Saif Ali Khan and Kareena Kapoor in the lead. Produced by Saif’s Illuminati Films, the film is a story about a spy. Currently being shot in Morocco, it is expected to release in May, 2011.

Personal Life

Sriram’s brother Sridhar Raghavan is a writer in Bollywood who has written dialogues-screenplay-story for films such as KHAKEE (2004) and BLUFFMASTER (2005).

Riddhi Mehta is editor of http://www.bollywoodchaska.com/content/sriram_raghavan-640/. She has over 3 years writing experience for bollywood movies. She says whatever she feels. She is not worried how bollywood will react to her views.

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Film

A few nice film images I found:

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Image by hsuanwei

Paris. /film
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Image by Magdalena O!
"À partir de cet instant, je n’avais plus un seul pas à faire, le sol marchait pour moi dans ce jardin où depuis si longtemps mes actes avaient cessé d’être accompagnés d’attention volontaire: l’Habitude venait de me prendre dans ses bras et me portait jusqu’à mon lit comme un petit enfant." – Proust

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Image by Ana Gremard
Developing my 35mm film

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Film

A few nice film images I found:

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Image by mag3737

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Image by bekah_cope

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Image by AlternativeMagic
A film canister


This on DA

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Nice Film photos

A few nice film images I found:

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Image by Nate.Lampa


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Image by K I ? E T I C


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Image by K I ? E T I C

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Privacy Window Film

If you are looking into options for providing you with more privacy and you are thinking about better window coverings, one idea you could consider is applying frosted privacy window film to your windows. It’s cheap, easy to apply yourself and it really can cut back on how much passersby can see into your home.

The most common film used for this is frosted window film. Frosted window film comes in a variety of designs, and varying degrees of opaqueness. A good white frosted film can allow up to 70 percent of light to come into a room, while still blocking almost all of the view into the room. This makes it ideal to use on doors such as glass front doors where you want to be able to see out but not have any visitors standing outside your door immediately able to see into your home. It is also perfect for adding privacy to bathroom shower stalls or bathroom doors.

Plain frosted film lets even more light into a room, up to 90 percent, however it doesn’t block people from seeing into your home as much as the more opaque white frosted film. Still, it is very good for windows, for example, where you can even just put a strip across the bottom half or third of the window.

Frosted film is not only used to provide more privacy for your home, but it is also perfect for decorating and sprucing up a room. It can be applied as a design on windows or on mirrors. It can outline the edge of a window or mirror, or you can even cut out designs and place them on your glass doors, windows and mirrors. There really is a lot of use for frosted film, besides it being used only as privacy window film.

Of course, the main reason people buy privacy window film is to provide a more secure and private environment. Even if that is your reason for buying and applying privacy film, you can also apply it in such a way that it adds to your overall décor and furnishings.

Susan L. West, a professional interior decorator, offers advice on how to decorate on a budget. Check out her updated advice all about blinds and ideas for privacy window film.

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Nice Film photos

Check out these film images:

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Image by Marcos Guevara Rivera

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Image by BrandFlair

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Image by bekah_cope

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Homecoming Film Review

Homecoming is a film that delves into the angst created by the dissolution and creation of relationships. A genre that dwells on the inner feelings we all experience when a relationship that we are involved in ends, and the dormant feelings of jealousy we can experience when a former dating or marriage partner has moved into a new relationship.

Homecoming focuses on a love triangle created when the town’s popular quarterback, Mike, returns from college to his high school with Elizabeth, his new girlfriend. His former flame, Shelby, who still held dreams of marriage with her high school boyfriend, is devastated by this turn of events. Instead of accepting the turn of events as reality, Shelby clings to the past as her version of reality.

Soon the competition between both females intensifies as an accident creates a state of dependency for one of the leading female characters. What distinguishes this movie from other similar films is the social message that the story conveys. Homecoming seeks to draw the battle lines between the two leading female characters along social lines.

On one side, you have Shelby who represents the quintessential small town American life. On her polar opposite you have Elizabeth, representing the implicit progress of the urban city life.

Instead of simply dwelling on a story of jealousy, the movie can be seen as a metaphor for the competing social pressures of those who seek to hold on to the small town lifestyle, and those who welcome the advancement that they feel that city life has to offer.

This social upheaval can be seen playing itself across America, Europe, Asia, and Africa, as the city limits encroach upon the borders of small towns. While city life can present advancement in terms of economic and social benefits, it also brings with it crime and disruption of the family nucleus.

You can watch over 3,000 international television channels directly from your computer for free through: http://www.infinityeleven.com Movies, news programs, sporting events, and music videos.

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Is Film Dead?

I’ve been called a dinosaur. It happened in a photography seminar a couple of years ago when the instructor asked for a show of hands from those still using film. Actually, I was one of two dinosaurs that he labelled. Not an encouraging ratio for a class of about 20 people.

It’s no surprise that professionals (like our seminar leader) have largely abandoned film, given the breakneck speed at which improvements in digital camera resolution and color accuracy are taking place. Gone are the days of carrying packs of Polaroid film and camera backs for verification of exposure and lighting. Now, we simply check the digital camera’s LCD screen and its histogram, and make instant adjustments.

One harbinger that struck home recently was when I took my 120 format film to my favourite camera store, a.k.a. my reliable old local film processing facility. They informed me that their machine was acting up and that they likely would not be replacing it if it failed. If I was to continue to make my big, beautiful transparencies, I was likely going to have to mail my film to another city for processing. Until, that is, their machines also croak.

You can’t blame them. They make their money selling digital cameras to a new throng of consumers who previously couldn’t have been bothered with getting films developed.

My disappointment doesn’t stem from the fact that I dislike digital. In fact, I shoot largely with a digital SLR now, and started scanning my 35mm films long before digital cameras achieved their current popularity. I also license my images online. In other words, I’m firmly entrenched in the digital photography realm.

I think it’s more a case of nostalgia. Only in recent years have I been able to afford quality medium format film gear, albeit used and decades old. They’re built like tanks and have lenses made from high quality glass. Yes – they’re heavy and awkward, but the image quality is phenomenal. After shooting grainy 35mm slides for decades, I was now ready to emulate work done by real magazine photographers. I even purchased a scanner that allows me to scan the larger format films.

So, do I now sell off my antiques and scanners, only to replace them with the best and newest digital SLR? Well, judging by the amount of used film gear being bought and sold online, I would say – not so fast! Yes, some companies have dropped out of the business of supplying films and processing chemicals (AGFA), but others like the UK’s venerable ILFORD (black and white only) and film giant KODAK are picking up the slack. New film products are even hitting the market! And others, like Freestyle Photographic Supplies, are doing what they can to keep the art alive by supplying film, darkroom supplies and film cameras.

Where this is leading me is that I can continue to use my film gear for as long as I’m willing to develop my own film, if necessary. The simplest by far to process is black and white, so when push comes to shove, that’s what I’ll be shooting. With my scanners, I’ll be able to convert the films directly to digital without worrying about printing with an enlarger.

Is film dead or dying? There is no doubt that the professional’s workflow today is predominantly digital. But, there is enough film equipment still working and in the hands of both professionals and enthusiastic amateurs that I can confidently predict that film will be around for a long time.

Gordon Wood is an engineer, writer and stock photographer. His main activity is technical writing, which he conducts through his company, Task Partner (http://taskpartner.ca). He has served in various industries, including microelectronics, anti-submarine warfare equipment development, heavy equipment manufacturing, medical imaging systems, digital projection systems and contract electronic manufacturing. Gordon’s photographic work can also be viewed at http://realworldphoto.com

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