Nice Live News photos

A few nice live news images I found:

Blackbuck horns
live news
Image by Leeds Museums and Galleries
Antilope cervicapra

Blackbuck used to live across the Indian subcontinent, but are now extinct in Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.

Find out more about the exhibition at www.leeds.gov.uk/museumsandgalleries/Pages/leedscitymuseu…

Find out more about Sara Porter at www.leeds.gov.uk/News/Pages/Meet-Sara-Porter.aspx

Order this print at artprints.leeds.gov.uk/artist/31472/Sara_Porter

Browse the exhibition range on Culture Label at www.culturelabel.com/shop/l/leeds-museums-and-galleries/

Visit Sara Porter’s website at www.saraporterphotography.co.uk/

This photograph was taken by Sara Porter for Leeds Museums and Galleries for the 2013 exhibition Natural Beauty and is licensed under Creative Commons BY NC SA

BBC Television News Archives
live news
Image by brizzle born and bred
A BBC news bulletin designed for television – BBC News and Newsreel – finally arrived on 5 July 1954.

Behind the scenes there was continuing conflict over editorial control. The radio news specialists based near Broadcasting House insisted on retaining responsibility for editorial policy, including headlines and story content. Only on those terms did they allow the TV service to get on with its job of looking after the pictures.

The result was a programme of two halves. It was Richard Baker who read the very first introduction: "Here is an illustrated summary of the news. It’ll be followed by the latest film of events and happenings at home and abroad."

All that appeared on screen during the summary was a series of stills – photographs, maps and so on. The newsreader could be heard – but not seen. All the film came in the second half.

"Crazy", was the verdict of the TV men involved; the formula was "absolutely ghastly". "As visually impressive as the fat stock prices," said one newspaper.

Within weeks, BH gave its blessing to faces being seen on screen – but only those of its own radio correspondents.

First to get the call was the parliamentary correspondent, ER Thompson. One of the big problems was the lack of an autocue machine, he recalled later.

This meant he and his colleague were obliged forever to look away from the camera, to glance down at their scripts. The newspapers called them "the guilty men". But television news, of a sort, was up and running.

The amount of time devoted to news on BBC TV more than doubled between 1954 and 1955.

John Cody Fidler-Simpson CBE (born 9 August 1944) is an English foreign correspondent. He is world affairs editor of BBC News. He has spent all his working life at the BBC. He has reported from more than 120 countries, including thirty war zones, and has interviewed many world leaders.

Simpson was born in London and says in his autobiography that his father was an anarchist. He was educated at Dulwich College Preparatory School and St Paul’s School, followed by Magdalene College, Cambridge, where he read English and was editor of Granta magazine. In 1965 he was a member of the Magdalene University Challenge team. A year later Simpson started as a trainee sub-editor at BBC radio news.

Desmond John Humphrys (born 17 August 1943) is a Welsh author, journalist and presenter of radio and television, who has won many national broadcasting awards. From 1981 to 1987 he was the main presenter for the Nine O’Clock News, the flagship BBC news television programme, and since 1987 he has been a presenter on the award-winning BBC Radio 4 programme, Today. He presents the programme with Justin Webb, James Naughtie, Evan Davis and Sarah Montague. Since 2003 he has been the host of the BBC Two television quiz show Mastermind.

Humphrys has a reputation as a tenacious and forthright interviewer; occasionally politicians have been very critical of his style after being subjected to a tough interview on live radio.

Humphrys was born in Pearl Street, Splott, son of Winifred Mary (Matthews), a hairdresser, and Edward George Humphrys, a self-employed French polisher. He was one of five children. His parents encouraged him to do his homework and he passed the eleven plus exam. He became a pupil at Cardiff High School (then a grammar school), but he did not fit into the middle-class environment there. He was an average pupil and left school at the age of 15 years to become a teenaged reporter on the Penarth Times. He later joined the Western Mail.

Richard Baker OBE (born 15 June 1925) is an English broadcaster, best known as a newsreader for BBC News from 1954 to 1982. He was a contemporary of Kenneth Kendall and Robert Dougall and was the first person to read the BBC Television News (in voiceover) in 1954.

The son of a plasterer, Baker was born in Willesden, North London, and educated at the former Kilburn Grammar School and at Peterhouse, Cambridge. After graduation, he was an actor at Birmingham Rep and a teacher at Wilson’s School, Camberwell. He served in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve during World War II and was awarded the Royal Naval Reserve decoration.

Tactical movement training [Image 2 of 3]
live news
Image by DVIDSHUB
Marines assigned to Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team Company Pacific, 2nd Platoon, carry a casualty on a stretcher while conducting tactical movement training. More than 50 Marines assigned to 2nd Platoon are training at Camp Rodriguez Live Fire Complex as part of FAST Exercise 2012 to further sustain and improve weapons marksmanship. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James Norman)
Navy Visual News Service
Date Taken:03.08.2012
Location:CAMP RODRIGUEZ, KR
Read more: www.dvidshub.net/image/539683/tactical-movement-training#…

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