Photos tagged posts

Nice African Songs photos

A few nice african songs images I found:

Groot-rooibandsuikerbekkie (1)
african songs
Image by Pixlab.co.za
Alternative Names:
English (Rob 6): Greater Doublecollared Sunbird
English (Rob 7): Greater Double-collared Sunbird
Scientific: Nectarinia afra
German: Großer Halsband-Nektarvogel
French: Souimanga à plastron rouge
Indigenous: iNcuncu(Z),iNcwincwi(Z),Ingcungcu(X),Ntsotsotso(Ts),Rithweethwee(Ts),Xidyamhangani(Ts),
Scientific Explained:
afra: Latin, African.
Measurements: Length 14-15 cm; wing (286 male) 59-65,7-72, (101 female) 54,3-59,6-65,5; tail (236 male) 48-55,2-65, (78 female) 42-47,4-55,5; tarsus (213 male) 14-16,6-19,5, (78 female) 14-15,6-17; culmen (227 male) 19,6-29,4-33, (71 female) 23,6-27-29,5; red breastband (200 male) 14-20,9-29,5. Weight (10 male) 11-12,2-13,3 g, (6 female) 8,1-9,8-11,3 g.
Bare Parts: Iris dark brown; bill, legs and feet black.
Identification: Size medium; similar to Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird, but larger, longer-billed and with broader red breastband. Male: Head, throat and back brilliant metallic green; rump blue; breastband bright red, about 20 mm wide (only about 8-10 mm wide in Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird), bordered above by narrow metallic blue band; belly smoky grey. Female: Above brownish grey; below light yellowish grey; separable from female Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird only by much longer bill and larger size. Immature: Similar to adult female.
Voice: Most common callnote by both sexes is high-pitched persistent tseeee, falling in tone; song sustained jumble of tweeting, twittering and chipping notes, louder and richer than song of Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird, usually starting with husky zhyeet or zheet-eet; characteristic harsh sskert callnote; excited ch ch ch cher-rreee by male when chasing female; stuttering hissing ss ss ss alarm notes.
Distribution: From sw Cape to n Transvaal; not Lesotho.
Status: Common resident; vagrant to Transvaal bushveld and lowveld.
Habitat: Coastal and riverine bush, forest edge, montane scrub, Protea savanna, parks, gardens.
Habits: Usually solitary or in pairs; gathers in loose groups of 6-7 birds at good food source, sometimes in company with other bird species, including other sunbirds. Male often sings from exposed perch, but also from inside bush; both sexes often chase conspecifics and other sunbirds. Hovers in front of webs to extract spiders.
Food: Nectar (e.g. Erythrina, Schotia, Protea, Erica, Salvia, Plumbago and many exotic garden flowers), insects, spiders.
Breeding: Season: All months (peak October-November) in e Cape, June to January in KwaZulu-Natal, June, July and October in Transvaal; probably most months throughout S Africa; up to 3 broods/season. Nest: Oval of grass, Usnea lichen, rootlets, bark, wool, cotton, fur, plant down, twigs, rags, dried fruits, leaf mould, etc., bound with spider web; lined with hundreds of feathers; side-top entrance always with porch; external height 13-15 cm; entrance diameter 3-4 cm; built by female only in 10-24 days. Clutch: (20) 1-1,8-2 eggs (usually 2). Eggs: White, greenish white to pale grey, spotted, mottled, clouded and scrawled with brown, olive and grey; measure (24) 18,6 x 12,4 (17-20,4 x 11,8-13,1). Incubation: 15-16 days by female only. Nestling: Unrecorded; fed by both parents.

Paddle steamer in New Orleans
african songs
Image by denisbin
Riverboat in New Orleans.

Some geography of New Orleans. The location and geography of New Orleans is unique in America. Most of the city is well below sea level, except for the French Quarter which was built on a natural levee of the river in the 1700s. As the city has expanded special levees, pumps and flood gates have been erected around the city. When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 the storm itself did damage to New Orleans but the major devastation came from the levees failing and water flooding at least 80% of the city area. It is useful to remember that 50% of New Orleans city is water and not land! Its location on the banks of the mighty Mississippi River, near the delta bayous and swamps was the raison d’être for the city. It was to control all navigation and commercial activity on the river and to provide a safe harbour as close as possible to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its strategic location it has always been the prize for invaders during wars. The city has a tropical climate and the regions north of the city along the banks of the Mississippi were and are major sugar plantation areas, not cotton plantation areas. You have to travel upstate in Louisiana to find the cotton growing areas. This tropical climate along one of the world’s major water courses meant until recently that the area was plagued with Yellow Fever, malaria and other deadly illnesses. To the north and east of the city is Lake Pontchartrain, a huge body of water; in fact the city is bordered by water on three sides. By road the mouth of the Mississippi is over 100 miles away but this is because the river follows a circuitous route to the mouth of its delta. The city metropolitan area has a population of 1.1 million, exactly the same as the population of Adelaide. Although the population fell after Hurricane Katrina the population is now 90% of what is was before the hurricane. There is little evidence of flood damage in the areas that we will see as tourists. The French Quarter was not flooded because the founding French settlers sensibly chose a high site for their city.

Some early history of New Orleans. The city was founded in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, a major trader in furs bought from the Indians up river. They got the local Indians, the Chitimacha to cede land to them. The Company named the city after the Duke of Orleans who was the Regent of France at that time. After the French Wars between the Indians, British, French and Spanish in America from 1756-63 the French ceded New Orleans to the Spanish. The Spanish held New Orleans from 1763 to 1801 when Napoleon defeated the Spanish and New Orleans and its territories to the west were returned to France. As Napoleon needed more funds to continue his Napoleonic Wars with Britain and others he soon (in 1803) sold New Orleans and all territories west of the Mississippi to President Jefferson for the small sum of million. West Florida, New Orleans and the west comprised over 800,000 square miles! The Louisiana Purchase covered – Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nth & Sth Dakota, Oklahoma & parts of Texas and Wyoming.

When the French settled New Orleans they built a trading port city of wooden buildings on the high ground along the banks of the Mississippi. The streets were named after the royal houses of France and Catholic saints, hence Bourbon Street after the Dukes of Bourbon, not the whisky. Local pine was the timber used for building the houses, often on brick pylons to raise the houses above any possible flood threat. The compact town was destroyed by two major fires during the Spanish ownership of Louisiana in 1788 and again in 1794. The city was rebuilt in brick, with wrought iron balconies in the Spanish style usually with central courtyards. So most of what we see today in the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is actually of Spanish design and from the era of Spanish building in the late 1790s. So the French Quarter is really the Spanish Quarter and the Spanish buildings include the three major public buildings of this era- the Cathedral of St. Louis, and the adjoining Cabildo and Presbytere. The first St. Louis Cathedral was built in 1781; the second in 1725; and the third in 1789. That third structure in Spanish style was almost totally rebuilt in 1850 in the style of the previous cathedral.

The Strategic Importance of New Orleans. Not long after the Americans bought New Orleans a major war broke out between England and her former American colonies. War raged from 1812-14 when the British, amongst other achievements, sailed up the Potomac River in Washington and burnt down the White House and attacked the national capital. As the port that controlled the Mississippi and the river system that went up to the British colonies in Canada the British wanted to retake New Orleans. A young American officer, Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson) led the American forces in a battle with the British. The battle of New Orleans (remember the hit song about it in 1959?) took place in January 1815. It was the final battle of the War of 1812 and despite bad odds Andrew Jackson and the Americans prevailed and won the battle. Hence the main square in New Orleans is Jackson Square with a fine statue of the later President on horseback is in the centre of the square. And again during the Civil War both the Confederates and Unionists wanted to control New Orleans. During the Antebellum period New Orleans had been a major port for the slave trade and the major slave auction centre of the American South. Louisiana declared their secession from the Union in January 1861 and the Confederates bolstered their occupation of the area. It was the link to the South’s cotton plantations up the Mississippi River Valley and its link across the Mississippi to the wealthy states of Texas, Arkansas and some secessionist counties of Missouri. The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861. New Orleans was blockaded by the North in May 1861 showing what an important prize the city was to the Union. After two short battles in April 1862 the Union forces occupied New Orleans and split the Confederacy into two parts as it then controlled the Mississippi River too.

The Creole Culture of New Orleans. Creole culture in Louisiana is still strong. Creoles are primarily the people descended from the early French and Spanish settlers mixed with later German immigrants and African slaves. Creoles were originally white Europeans but the term later included mixed race people. When the Haitian Revolution led by slaves erupted in 1804 many French residents fled from Haiti to New Orleans with their African slaves. They reinforced the French culture of New Orleans and established their three tiered society of white Creoles, mixed race Creoles and black slaves. The mixed race Creoles were mainly fee black people and added to the free black population of New Orleans. French speakers dominated in New Orleans until 1830. But as late as 1900, 25% of residents spoke French and 75% could understand it. (250,000 Louisianans still speak French at home today.) Half the schools in New Orleans taught in French until the Civil War. In 1862 the Union occupier of the city General Butler abolished French instruction and enforced English teaching. The War made New Orleans an American city. But the Creoles did not disappear. They continued to dominate society for some time. The Creole planters along the Mississippi lived on their plantations during the hot malaria filled summers but moved to their French Quarter town houses for the cool winters. (It was the reverse in Charleston where the planters lived in Charleston in the hot summers and spent winters on their plantations.) The New Orleans winter was the time for balls and parties and the celebrations around Lent and the Mardi Gras activities, which still persist as a reminder of the French heritage of the city. The white French Creoles also often took black slave women as mistresses but unlike the white Americans they tended to give freedom to the children born from these unions. Thus New Orleans ended up with the largest number of free blacks of any Southern city in the Antebellum days. Mixed race Creoles had their own society balls and functions. Many had property and were quite wealthy in their own rights because of grants from their white Creole fathers. But their access to political and legal rights disappeared during the Jim Crow era as white Americans applied their white-black caste system on all parts of America including Louisiana. Free persons of colour were discriminated against by the Jim Crow regulations and segregation in New Orleans too. Change came with of the Civil Rights era.

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Nice Live News photos

Check out these live news images:

Living Museum in Newport News, VA.
live news
Image by Still Heidi

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Nice News Live photos

Check out these news live images:

” Imagine … Living as one … Imagine living life in peace “
news live
Image by gmayster01 on & off …
The news emanating from Libya are quite disturbing
Imagine a perfect world with a positive déroulement of …
Photo of my daughter Sonia and her beau Alain as a metaphor for unity & peace
B&W repost
g
www.youtube.com/watch?v=mVAQl7qq-aI

Imagine – Herbie Hancock featuring Pink , Indira.Arie , Seal

Montreal

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VxZtxzI8V0w

Herbie Hancock – The Imagine Prohect EPK part 1

"Music transcends so many of the barriers between people
It appeals to the what we have in common "
Herbie Hancock

"A picture is worth a thousand words"
author unknown

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Nice Audio photos

Check out these audio images:

audio surveillance zone
audio
Image by Terry Freedman
audio surveillance zone

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Nice African Songs photos

Some cool african songs images:

RIver of soul – Marcomé – New World Music
african songs
Image by Marcome : Ambient New Age Music
River of Soul is the second New World music album by Marcomé.
This pivotal sophomore release successfully fuses the dreaminess of New Age music, the sultriness of World and boasts an exotic palette of Latin sounds, Middle-Eastern instrumentation, jazz and African rhythms.

get your free songs at www.Marcome.com

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Nice Casablanca photos

A few nice casablanca images I found:

Mosqué Hassan II, Casablanca, Maroc
casablanca
Image by Gilles Messian

Mosqué Hassan II, Casablanca, Maroc
casablanca
Image by Gilles Messian

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Nice Radio photos

A few nice radio images I found:

radio
radio
Image by Gerard Stolk (vers le 14 juillet)
nostalgie

RADIO
radio
Image by Jeff Holt UK Photographer

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Nice Morocco photos

Check out these morocco images:

Ifni Blues No.6
morocco
Image by mhobl

AT THE MARKET
morocco
Image by fabiogis50
PhotoAwardsCounter
Click here to see the awards count for this photo. (?)<

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Nice African Songs photos

Some cool african songs images:

75_and no wonder his coat had an empty sleeve
african songs
Image by Jim Surkamp
Hamilton Hatter’s Tense Charles Town, WV 1865-1867 – While the ruins are still smoking

Transcript from Video
youtu.be/YqCZlSMFVCs TRT: 26:58

With generous, community-minded support from American Public University System. (The sentiments in this production do not in any way reflect modern-day policies of APUS). More at apus.edu

1_Mother of thine stone fountains
Mother of thine stone fountains; my heart goes back with the setting sun; my heart, my heart is in the mountains. (piano).

2_The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter
The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter (1856-1942) Part 1 (music)

3_Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia
Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia, Hamilton Hatter

4_seizes opportunities to learn and overcome
seizes opportunities to learn and overcome. At one college he builds young minds and even its buildings –

5_then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia
then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia again building minds and buildings.

6_Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues
Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues: The third event that I’d like to share with you from the Hatter family history is about Hamilton Hatter. Hamilton is the son of Rebecca and Franklin Hatter and he was born in 1856. Hamilton was a very industrious young man and did everything he could in order to make money because his desire was to gain an education He learned to do house framing, make plows – he was very, very handy. (music) But first he had to overcome.

7_But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.
But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.

8_His almost savage answers did not move me
His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

9_and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON
"and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON!” (music)

10_The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age
The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age, neatly and comfortably clad, well fed, healthy, and cheerful,

11_with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks
with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks. (crickets, dog bark)

12_Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865
Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865, a war-worn town with its ruins and seething and

13_six months before Hatter’s school was opened there.
six months before Hatter’s school was opened there. (train sound) Trowbridge arrived at Charlestown in about May, 1865 expecting nothing in particular.

14_He came by train from Harper’s Ferry
(He came by train from Harper’s Ferry a hub of Federal army activity). (women wail)

15_Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there
Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there along with women with children, some “cut loose” by their onetime owners and they sought medical help, food and shelter. (women wail crickets)

16_Able-bodied freedmen were in demand
Able-bodied freedmen were in demand and they were paid well to get the corn and wheat planted). (train)

17_One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown
One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown, distant from Harper’s Ferry of eight miles. The railroad was still in the hands of the government.

18_There were military guards on the platform
There were military guards on the platforms, and about an equal mixture of Loyalists and Rebels within the cars.

19_Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments
Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments at Winchester or Staunton, occupied seats with

20_Confederate officers just out of their uniforms
Confederate officers just out of their uniforms. The strong, dark, defiant, self-satisfied face typical of the second-rate “chivalry,” and the good-natured,

21_shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator
shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator going to look at Southern lands,

22_were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast.
were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast. There also rode the well-dressed

23_wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts
wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts, and

24_the humble freedman returning to the home
the humble freedman returning to the home from which he had been driven by violence.(train)

25_Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia
Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia sat serene and uncomplaining in the atmosphere of mothers and daughters of late their slaves or their neighbors’, but now citizens like themselves, free to go and come, and as dearly entitled to places in the government train as the proudest dames of the land. We passed through a region of country

26_stamped all over by the devastating heel of war
stamped all over by the devastating heel of war. (raven) For miles

27_not a fence or cultivated field was visible
not a fence or cultivated field was visible.

28_It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,
“It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,” said a gentleman at my side, a Union man from Winchester.

29_The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest
“The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest." Harper’s Magazine Writer and Illustrator

30_David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote
David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote of just one such landowner who meets in a store a one-time slave of his: (banjo)

31_Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store
Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store, where they had gone to transact some business and make purchases. They had parted in 1862, but recognized and greeted each other with the cordiality of ancient friendship, instinctively the while taking stock of each others appearance and deportment. The negro was hale, sleek, and well dressed, and in settling up a smart account which stood against him on the merchants books he showed a porte monnaie plethoric with the results of a summers steady work. The master’s heart was warmed at the evident prosperity of his old servant. (banjo)

32_He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky
He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky, and had prophesied his ruin when left to his own devices. Unlike Jonah and most other prophets of evil, he was not embittered at the non-fulfillment of his predictions, but cordially invited Harry out to see the family and the old place. (banjo). The freedman’s observations had not been so satisfactory. The old master was roughly clad in ex-Confederate gray, faded, stained, threadbare, and frayed at the button-holes; his hair and beard grizzled to suit, and his face haggard and care-worn. His pocketbook resembled a dried North Carolina herring. In making his purchases he was scrutinizing and skimpy, and once

33_obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear
obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear. (banjo) That afternoon

34_Harry walked out to the old place
Harry walked out to the old place, and it saddened his heart to see it. The noble woodland that used to be so jealously preserved, (banjo) and was always teeming with possums and coons, had been hacked and haggled until it had nearly disappeared.

35_36_The barn was gone
The barn was gone, and only some charred and blackened stumps indicated where it once stood. The house was paint-less and dilapidated, the enclosures broken, gates off their hinges, or rudely mended with rails or boards; the shade trees worm-eaten and dying at the top, the lawn and borders hirsute with weeds and suckers. (banjo) But still, as of yore, a

37_a hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney
hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney, and the proprietor was ready with a cheerful and friendly welcome.

38_Harry respectfully dropped his hat
Harry respectfully dropped his hat upon the porch floor, while he nervously fumbled for a package in his coat pocket. "I say, Mister Charles, do you still use tabaccy ?" (The negro now carefully abstains from the master and mistress in his address.)

39_Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco
"Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco and a pipe I got for you in town. "Harry looked confounded, and then, shaking with deferential hilarity,

40_excavated a package of like character from his own pocket.
excavated a package of like character from his own pocket. (banjo) Trowbridge continued:

41_I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates.
I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates. "They should be; but

42_your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land.
your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land. He will part with his acres about as willingly as he will part with his life. But everything is being revolutionized now.

43_Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill
Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill. (train)

44_It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world
It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world. The only objection to it is that

45_in spots the limestone crops out a good deal
in spots the limestone crops out a good deal.” (train) At the end of a long hour’s ride,

46_we arrived at Charles Town
47_interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom
we arrived at Charles Town, chiefly of interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom. (music)

48_We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields
49_unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves
We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves – rivers to that ocean of weeds. The town resembled to my eye some unprotected female sitting, sorrowful on the wayside,

50_in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen.jpg
in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen negligently about features which might once have been attractive. (music)

51_On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance.jpg
52_whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.jpg
On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.”

53_He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried.jpg
He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried. While Jefferson County, West Virginia is still small, the sentiment toward secession throughout the County before the Civil War varied widely, with

54_the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown
the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown and adjacent large farms. (mandolin)

55_They are all Rebels here – all rebels!
“They are all Rebels here – all rebels!” he exclaimed as he took his cane and walked with me. “They are a pitiable poverty-stricken set, there is no money in the place, and scarcely anything to eat.

56_We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason
We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason. Fried potatoes, treason, and salt-fish for dinner. At supper, the fare is slightly varied, and we have treason, salt-fish potatoes, and a little more treason.

57_My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate.jpg
My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate; and she illustrates Southern politeness by abusing Northern people and the government from morning ‘till night, for my especial edification. Sometimes I venture to answer her, when she flies at me, figuratively speaking, like a cat. The women are not the only out-spoken Rebels, although they are the worst.

58_The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments
The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments, in season and out of season.” (mandolin).
My friend concluded with this figure:

59_The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it
“The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it. Looked at from the outside, the fire seems quenched. But just peep under the blanket and there it is, all alive and eating, eating in. The wet blanket is the present government policy; and

60_every act of conciliation shown the Rebels
every act of conciliation shown the Rebels is just letting in so much air to feed the fire.” (mandolin)

61_A short walk up into the center of town.jpg
62_John Browns trial andhanging became symbols to soldiers during the Civil War.jpg
A short walk up into the center of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. (music, gavel, wagon),

63_John Brown’s body lies a mouldering in the grave.jpg
Oh John Brown’s body lies a moulderin’ in the grave, While weep the sons of bondage whom he ventured all to save; But tho he lost his life while struggling for the slave,

64_his soul is marching on.jpg
His soul is marching on. Glory,

65_Glory Glory hallelujah.jpg
66_John Brown Hanged.jpg
glory, hallelujah (humming, drums)(eerie music) It was a consolation to see that

67_the jail had been laid in ashes.jpg
the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the

68_court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed.jpg
69_a ruin abandoned to rats and toads
court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. (toads) Four mossy white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof, through which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled.(music) The main portion of the building had been literally torn to pieces.

70_In the floorless hall of justice.jpg
In the floorless hall of justice, rank weeds were growing. Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the wall. No torch had been applied to the wood-work, but the work of destruction had been

71_performed by hilarious soldier boys.jpg
performed by the hands of (laughter) hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown” – the swelling melody of the song and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens who thought to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. (eerie music,Glory, glory hallelujah). As we were taking comfort, reflecting how unexpectedly at last justice had been done at that court-house, (horse whinny,wagon) the townspeople passed on the sidewalk,

72_“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
73_a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class; one of whom, at a question which I put to him, stopped quite willingly and talked with us. I have seldom seen a handsome young face, a steadier eye, or more decided pose and aplomb, neither have I ever seen the outward garment of courtesy so plumply filled out with the spirit of arrogance. His brief replies spoken with a pleasant countenance,

74_yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots.jpg
yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots. Very evidently the death of John Brown, and the war that came swooping down the old man’s path to avenge him, and to accomplish the work wherein he failed, were not pleasing subjects to this young southern blood.

75_and no wonder his coat had an empty sleeve.jpg
And no wonder. His coat had an empty sleeve. The arm which should have been there had been lost fighting against his country. His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while

76_I looked with compassion at his fine young face
I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

77_He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost
78_all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.jpg
He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost, not arms and legs only, but all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.

79_His beautiful South had been devastated.jpg
80_her soul drenched with the best blood
His beautiful South was devastated, and her soil drenched with the best blood of her young men. Whether regarded as a crime or a virtue, (mandolin) the folly of making war upon the mighty North was now demonstrated, and

81_the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South.jpg
82_May well your thoughts be bitter
the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South. “Well may your thoughts be bitter,” my heart said, as I thanked him for his information. (mandolin) To my surprise he seemed mollified, his answers losing their explosive quality and sharp downward inflection. He even seemed inclined to continue the conversation and as we passed we left him on the sidewalk looking after us wistfully, as if the spirit working within him had still no word to say different from any he had yet spoken. What his secret thoughts were, standing there with his dangling sleeve, it would be interesting to know. (mandolin)

83_Walking through the town we came to.jpg
84_Here we engaged a bright young colored girl.jpg
Walking through town we came to other barren and open fields on the further side. Here we engaged a bright young colored girl to guide us to the spot where John Brown’s gallows stood. (music) She led us into the wilderness of weeds waist-high to her as she tramped on, parting them before her with her hands. The country all around us lay utterly desolate without enclosures, and without cultivation. We seemed to be striking out into the rolling prairies of the West, except that these fields of ripening and fading weeds had not the summer freshness of the prairie-grass. A few scattering groves skirted them; and here and there a fenceless road drew its winding, dusty line away over the arid hills.

85_“This is about where it was,” said the girl
“This is about where it was,” said the girl, after searching some time among the tall weeds. (music)

Bryan O’Quinn: A Star Is Reborn; Inside:New Music, New natural haircare endorsment and new attitude; There’s More to life!
african songs
Image by ImagePros
Entertainment businessman, business owner, community organizer, model, songwriter, music producer, father, citizen of the world. Bryan O’Quinn was one of the few underground dance music artists to enjoy negligible mainstream exposure during the late ’80s and early ’90s heyday of hip- hop soul
For his new album, Mr. O’Quinn has drawn inspiration from his own songs that have held special moments and professional milestones through the years, and he has dedicated the album to: love, inspiration and dance.

www.nme.com/nme-video/youtube/id/unWFQygEsJA

The Musicale, Barber Shop, Trenton Falls, New York (1866) – Thomas Hicks (American 1823-1890)
african songs
Image by UGArdener
"In nineteenth-century painting, African Americans are often associated with music and dance. (See Christian Mayr’s Kitchen Ball at White Sulphur Springs, Virginia, also in the Museum’s collection.) In this painting Thomas Hicks depicts an impromptu concert in the barbershop of a summer resort in upstate New York. Occupying a separate building on the hotel grounds, the shop was a male preserve, women by custom keeping a respectful distance. The dignified man frozen in mid-song is the hotel’s barber, William Brister. Among the accompanying musicians is a black fiddler who, like the barber, is rendered with none of the usual racial stereotyping. Even so, it is obvious the black men are not guests but employees of the hotel. It is only their musical talent that justifies their prominence in the picture."

artnc.org/works-of-art/musicale-barber-shop-trenton-falls…

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Nice Music photos

A few nice music images I found:

Gibson 19
music
Image by Larry Ziffle

saxophone
music
Image by siaronj
close up of saxophone on carpet

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