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Cool Led Tv images

A few nice led tv images I found:

Glastonmudbury
led tv
Image by brizzle born and bred
Weather forecast for Glastonbury Festival 2014: It’s going to rain (like it does every year) Glastonbury Festival: revellers put on a brave face as mud returns

It wouldn’t be the same without it.

Mud, mud, glorious mud and rainsodden tents – thanks to hailstones and lightning storms which hit the festival last night during the first top acts.

Canadian rockers Arcade Fire headlined the Pyramid stage during a heavy downpour while Rudimental were forced to cut short their set due to an electrical storm.

Music on all outside stages – and many inside ones – was suspended as the storm hit late in the afternoon.

The cloudburst lasted more than an hour and organisers took the decision within minutes to close the stages, as some festivalgoers took cover to escape torrential rain and hailstones.

The thunderstorm began at around 5pm, but the rain did not start for another 20 minutes.

By 6.45pm the storm had passed and the music started once again.

Early estimates indicate that around half an inch of rain fell on the festival site in less than an hour, turning the vast areas of Worthy Farm into a mudbath.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The cloudburst lasted more than an hour and organisers took the decision within minutes to close the stages, as some festivalgoers took cover to escape torrential rain and hailstones.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The thunderstorm began at around 5pm, but the rain did not start for another 20 minutes.

By 6.45pm the storm had passed and the music started once again.

Early estimates indicate that around half an inch of rain fell on the festival site in less than an hour, turning the vast areas of Worthy Farm into a mudbath.

It is the first time in many years that an electrical storm has stopped the entertainment in mid-flow.

The downpours led to woodchips being spread over large parts of the Glastonmudbury site to soak up waterlogged fields.

The muddiest year was in 1997 when 78mm of rain fell eight out of nine days in the run-up to the event.

Glastonbury over the years

WHEN a few hundred hippies gathered in a field near Glastonbury in 1970 no one could have envisaged that they were witnessing the birth of the world’s largest open-air music festival. It was the day after Jimi hendrix died and the £1 admission cost included milk from the nearby dairy farm.

Organisers unwittingly enlisted the local hell’s Angels chapter to handle security but they are said to have made off with the ox roast.

Although memories of that first Glastonbury are now hazy it is widely accepted that a Bristol rock band called Stackridge has the distinction of being the first to perform at this now legendary festival.

As Glastonbury celebrates its 40th anniversary later this month more than 170,000 people, the equivalent of the population of Peterborough, will descend on this beautiful corner of Somerset for the latest four-day extravaganza.

The event has survived floods, lightning strikes and a gatecrashing crisis 10 years ago, which resulted in an estimated 200,000 people cramming on to Worthy Farm to set a record attendance.

Glastonbury has become a monster yet when the last drum roll has been sounded, the stages dismantled and 800 stalls selling everything from blankets to burgers cleared away, it reverts to a working farm.

Visit in late summer and the chances are you will spot a badger snuffling in the hedgerows. For that reason staging Glastonbury poses one of the biggest challenges in the entertainment business.

For the BBC too, which will be at Glastonbury in force, the festival is a military- style operation that will result in more than 40 hours of live radio and TV broadcasting.

That level of organisation is in stark contrast to the 1970 festival, which wasn’t happening at all until a group of travellers from Stonehenge arrived unexpectedly and threw it all together at the last minute. now nothing is left to chance.

An army of 34,000 workers including 400 first-aiders puts it all together. A huge 32-ton roller is used to flatten the uneven ground to prevent sprained ankles, while tractors fitted with magnets scour the site after- wards to scoop up hundreds of lost and discarded tent pegs which could harm wildlife. There are 20 bars, 300 showers and about 4,500 toilets.

This year the site has been ex- tended to cover almost 1,300 acres with a perimeter security fence stretching almost six miles.

The BBC will be taking almost 40 miles of cable and 47 cameras, while Glastonbury even has two underground, terrorist-proof reservoirs that can each hold one million litres of water.

“It is a balancing act because Glastonbury is both farm and festival,” says infrastructure manager Phil Miller.

“You can’t just concrete the place to make the job easier. I’m a laid back chap but from the beginning of May I do have sleepless nights with lists whirring through my head. Probably my worst nightmare is beyond my control: the weather.” The Glastonbury mud is the stuff of legends. In 2005 dinghies not wellies were the order of the day when two months of rain fell on the festival in a few hours.

The main stage, the Pyramid, was under a foot of water and power was lost. half a mile of pipes has since been installed to improve drainage but almost as bad can be a long, dry spell, which results in clouds of unbearable dust as lorries trundle in.

Although it is now possible to have a “Glastonbury-lite” experience by venturing in and out for performances, some 85,000 people will camp in the Worthy Farm grounds this year. Sewage must be collected each night, stored in a 750,000-gallon lagoon and taken away for disposal in hundreds of tankers. Scores of mobile telephones, unwittingly dropped down toilets, are first fished out.

The booking of bands is a round- the-year job but work begins in earnest to prepare the site in February. Only the main stage is permanent, the other nine have to be constructed from scratch, while it takes about a month to dismantle everything.

Power cuts are a disaster in waiting for any music festival so Glastonbury has both mains electricity and sufficient generators to supply a small town in the event of a failure.

Miller says that the 15-feet high security fence, which also spans the river that cuts the site almost in two, is impenetrable.

One of the low points in the festival’s history was the post-ponement of the 2001 event to give organisers time to react to the mass invasion by gatecrashers that had happened the previous year.

The BBC has been broadcasting from the festival since 1985 on radio, followed by television coverage in 1997. Mark Cooper, the corporation’s executive producer for television, hasn’t missed a festival since those first images were beamed to the nation’s living rooms.

This year more than 16million viewers will tune in to watch the festival on three BBC channels, plus there is online coverage.

“It’s the mother of all festivals,” says Cooper. “In terms of television coverage Glastonbury has become the biggest music event in the world but we started with just eight hours on BBC2.”

This year across the BBC network, including online and on the interactive red button, there will be 157 hours of live and recorded coverage.

Its army of workers will get through 80 pints of milk and 10 tins of biscuits each day. Like Miller, Cooper fears the elements the most. Past BBC coverage has been threatened by 60mph winds and countless torrential downpours.

“At times the weather has been biblical,” says Cooper. “I can remember John Peel standing under an umbrella

in 2005 saying: ‘It’s the end of the world’. Our position was near a stream that had burst its banks and we had to rebuild it in a completely different area. no equipment is weather-proof but so far we’ve never been forced off air.

That would be unthinkable.” Cooper’s own biggest personal disaster was forgetting his wellies one year but he says. “Communications are one of the biggest issues.

“In the early days there was no mobile phone signal at Glastonbury. even now when all the trucks are linked by intercom it’s often easier to walk to sort things out but try doing that in six inches of mud or worse. It’s slow and exhausting.”

In many respects Glastonbury, which this year runs between June 24 to 27, is even bigger than events such as the World Cup when the BBC can rely on feed from host broadcasters. At the festival every minute of coverage is self-generated.

Covering Glastonbury costs the BBC an estimated £1.5million. Paul Rodgers, editor of the BBC’s 6 Music, says:

“The festival is now part of our cultural heritage.

“For us, planning is now taking place almost all year round. If we don’t get the sound right there’s not much point in us being there.”

Both 6 Music and Radio 1 will have their own studios containing charts showing where every worker and piece of equipment is. Last year the corporation had to react to the unfortunate death of Michael Jackson, which forced a sudden change of plans as reporters were dispatched to every corner of the grounds to seek reaction from the stars.

“It’s a live event so it’s inevitable that some of our coverage is on the hoof but that is what makes it so exciting,” adds Rodgers.

“The worst possible case scenario for us would be a total technical blackout.” Plenty of spares are packed because popping out to the BBC storeroom or the shops for a replacement light bulb is not really an option at the festival.

Another problem for the BBC is securing agreement from the stars about how much of their set can be broadcast. In the past David Bowie and Rod Stewart have limited live coverage to a handful of songs.

Last year Bruce Springsteen topped the bill triumphantly with a two-and-half hour set which cost the organisers a £3,000 fine for breaking a midnight curfew.

Such is the lure of the festival that leading musicians and bands regularly agree to perform for a fraction of their normal fees. Residents in the nearby hamlets of Pilton, Pill and Sticklynch are generally a tolerant lot, although some are known to decamp for festival week, or they make a few bob by renting out their homes. Tradition- ally the villagers are given free tickets.

Despite all the meticulous planning the unexpected can and does happen. This year Glastonbury lost one of its headline acts, U2, after a back injury suffered by Bono forced the band’s late withdrawal. For Michael Eavis, the dairy farm owner and Glastonbury founder, it meant a frantic search for a replacement before Gorillaz stepped in.

There is barely a big band that hasn’t performed there but he has still to entice the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin to play. His daughter Emily, who works behind the scenes to arrange the line-up, says the main criterion for selection is stage presence.

“You need to be able to play a really good live set. We’re not bothered about how many records you’ve sold.”

They were initially told by Springsteen’s agent that they couldn’t afford him but the Boss relented after being sent a dossier about the festival’s history and donations to good causes.

The power of Glastonbury had worked its magic again.

The Cats of Riga
led tv
Image by A.Davey
Why are we in the Baltics? It’s all because of a TV program, "The Dogs of Riga." It’s a police procedural based on a book by Henning Mankell. After watching it, we found ourselves wondering what Riga is like. One thing led to another, and here we are!

So far, every cat we’ve seen in Riga has been black and white. This B&W puss was basking in the morning sun, a million miles away from everything, until we came along like a pack of paparazzi and interrupted her morning meditations. No wonder she looks miffed.

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Cool Casablanca Hotels images

Some cool casablanca hotels images:

Man Living in Ruins of Hotel Lincoln – City Centre – Casablanca, Morocco
casablanca hotels
Image by Adam Jones, Ph.D. – Global Photo Archive

P1040178.JPG
casablanca hotels
Image by Ken Levine Images
nearby Hotel Casablanca

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Cool Maroc images

A few nice maroc images I found:

Tajine au chou fleur, Moulay Driss Zerhoun, province de Meknès, Maroc.
maroc
Image by byb64
.

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Cool Marrakech images

Some cool marrakech images:

RMS-150518-2877
marrakech
Image by icpc.news
Photographer: Bob Smith

RMS-150518-2405-2
marrakech
Image by icpc.news
Photographer: Bob Smith

RMS-150518-2523-2
marrakech
Image by icpc.news
Photographer: Bob Smith

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Cool Audio images

Check out these audio images:

Microphone
audio
Image by quinn.anya
From the audio booth at work

Master
audio
Image by giu-di

audio_201204_139
audio
Image by xkojix
??????????????

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Cool Maroc images

Some cool maroc images:

Lac artificiel, Ifrane, Moyen Atlas, région de Fès-Meknès, Maroc.
maroc
Image by byb64 (en voyage jusqu’au 8-10)
Ifrane, située à 1664 mètres d’altitude, station d’estivage au temps du protectorat, aujourd’hui lieu de villégiature estivale pour la bourgeoisie marocaine.

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Cool Rhodes images

Some cool rhodes images:

Rhodes
rhodes
Image by Amy Windsor

Rhodes
rhodes
Image by Francesco Ugolini
October 2010

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Cool Morocco Music images

Some cool morocco music images:

10 ans AfSafi
morocco music
Image by fabecollage
safi, Maroc 2016

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Cool News Live images

Some cool news live images:

“The training is good, it’s great. It helps us to learn and to earn a living”
news live
Image by DFID – UK Department for International Development
Nahed* is from Homs in Syria.

"I was living happily there before the conflict started", she says.

"But after it began, the situation became mixed-up. We decided to come to Lebanon, because I was afraid for my children. They were traumatised by what they had seen and heard."

"The cooperative and IRC offered us this work making fishing nets here. The training is good, it’s great. It helps us to learn and to earn a living."

"I hope to be able to sell the nets to get some income, to be able to support my family."

Learning how to knit fishing nets might not seem the most urgent priority for refugees who fled Syria’s civil war, yet the International Rescue Committee believes that providing the essential tools to help people to find work is a vital way to help them support themselves.

The women also learn how to finish nets by sewing weights and floats to them. The nets are then ready for sale to local fishermen. There’s certainly an art to the craft; it takes months of practice to become expert. Once fully trained it is possible for one woman to knit a 100-meter or 300 foot long fishing net in just three hours.

The UK has committed over £800 million to help those affected by the conflict in Syria – our largest ever response to a humanitarian crisis.

In addition to livelihoods projects like this one, UK funding is providing support including food, medical care and relief items for over a million people – people who have been affected by the fighting but are still inside Syria and those who have fled the country and become refugees in neighbouring Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey and Iraq.

Picture: Russell Watkins/DFID

At Broad Channel – in the Living room (LOC)
news live
Image by The Library of Congress
Bain News Service,, publisher.

At Broad Channel – in the Living room

[between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915]

1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller.

Notes:
Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards.
Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress).

Format: Glass negatives.

Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication.

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain

Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.19852

Call Number: LC-B2- 3583-4

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Cool Morocco Music images

Check out these morocco music images:

Moroccan Holiday (Day 7)
morocco music
Image by Ruanae
Photos from day 7 of my Moroccan Holiday (Christmas 2009)

20100529-_MG_4574
morocco music
Image by unaoc
Merieme Bachar from Morocco reads youth recommendations at closing session, 28 May 2010.

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