cool tagged posts

Cool Rhodes images

Some cool rhodes images:

Windmill on Rhodes
rhodes
Image by Tristan Honscheid
Island of Rhodes, Greece

Rhode-4593.JPG
rhodes
Image by robwouds

Rhode Island
rhodes
Image by NASA Videographer
Green Hill Beach, Rhode Island

Read More

Cool African Songs images

Some cool african songs images:

Horse Hitching posts in the Garden District . Tie up your horse here.
african songs
Image by denisbin
Horse hitching posts in the Garden dIstrict of New Orleans.

Some geography of New Orleans. The location and geography of New Orleans is unique in America. Most of the city is well below sea level, except for the French Quarter which was built on a natural levee of the river in the 1700s. As the city has expanded special levees, pumps and flood gates have been erected around the city. When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 the storm itself did damage to New Orleans but the major devastation came from the levees failing and water flooding at least 80% of the city area. It is useful to remember that 50% of New Orleans city is water and not land! Its location on the banks of the mighty Mississippi River, near the delta bayous and swamps was the raison d’être for the city. It was to control all navigation and commercial activity on the river and to provide a safe harbour as close as possible to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its strategic location it has always been the prize for invaders during wars. The city has a tropical climate and the regions north of the city along the banks of the Mississippi were and are major sugar plantation areas, not cotton plantation areas. You have to travel upstate in Louisiana to find the cotton growing areas. This tropical climate along one of the world’s major water courses meant until recently that the area was plagued with Yellow Fever, malaria and other deadly illnesses. To the north and east of the city is Lake Pontchartrain, a huge body of water; in fact the city is bordered by water on three sides. By road the mouth of the Mississippi is over 100 miles away but this is because the river follows a circuitous route to the mouth of its delta. The city metropolitan area has a population of 1.1 million, exactly the same as the population of Adelaide. Although the population fell after Hurricane Katrina the population is now 90% of what is was before the hurricane. There is little evidence of flood damage in the areas that we will see as tourists. The French Quarter was not flooded because the founding French settlers sensibly chose a high site for their city.

Some early history of New Orleans. The city was founded in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, a major trader in furs bought from the Indians up river. They got the local Indians, the Chitimacha to cede land to them. The Company named the city after the Duke of Orleans who was the Regent of France at that time. After the French Wars between the Indians, British, French and Spanish in America from 1756-63 the French ceded New Orleans to the Spanish. The Spanish held New Orleans from 1763 to 1801 when Napoleon defeated the Spanish and New Orleans and its territories to the west were returned to France. As Napoleon needed more funds to continue his Napoleonic Wars with Britain and others he soon (in 1803) sold New Orleans and all territories west of the Mississippi to President Jefferson for the small sum of million. West Florida, New Orleans and the west comprised over 800,000 square miles! The Louisiana Purchase covered – Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nth & Sth Dakota, Oklahoma & parts of Texas and Wyoming.

When the French settled New Orleans they built a trading port city of wooden buildings on the high ground along the banks of the Mississippi. The streets were named after the royal houses of France and Catholic saints, hence Bourbon Street after the Dukes of Bourbon, not the whisky. Local pine was the timber used for building the houses, often on brick pylons to raise the houses above any possible flood threat. The compact town was destroyed by two major fires during the Spanish ownership of Louisiana in 1788 and again in 1794. The city was rebuilt in brick, with wrought iron balconies in the Spanish style usually with central courtyards. So most of what we see today in the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is actually of Spanish design and from the era of Spanish building in the late 1790s. So the French Quarter is really the Spanish Quarter and the Spanish buildings include the three major public buildings of this era- the Cathedral of St. Louis, and the adjoining Cabildo and Presbytere. The first St. Louis Cathedral was built in 1781; the second in 1725; and the third in 1789. That third structure in Spanish style was almost totally rebuilt in 1850 in the style of the previous cathedral.

The Strategic Importance of New Orleans. Not long after the Americans bought New Orleans a major war broke out between England and her former American colonies. War raged from 1812-14 when the British, amongst other achievements, sailed up the Potomac River in Washington and burnt down the White House and attacked the national capital. As the port that controlled the Mississippi and the river system that went up to the British colonies in Canada the British wanted to retake New Orleans. A young American officer, Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson) led the American forces in a battle with the British. The battle of New Orleans (remember the hit song about it in 1959?) took place in January 1815. It was the final battle of the War of 1812 and despite bad odds Andrew Jackson and the Americans prevailed and won the battle. Hence the main square in New Orleans is Jackson Square with a fine statue of the later President on horseback is in the centre of the square. And again during the Civil War both the Confederates and Unionists wanted to control New Orleans. During the Antebellum period New Orleans had been a major port for the slave trade and the major slave auction centre of the American South. Louisiana declared their secession from the Union in January 1861 and the Confederates bolstered their occupation of the area. It was the link to the South’s cotton plantations up the Mississippi River Valley and its link across the Mississippi to the wealthy states of Texas, Arkansas and some secessionist counties of Missouri. The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861. New Orleans was blockaded by the North in May 1861 showing what an important prize the city was to the Union. After two short battles in April 1862 the Union forces occupied New Orleans and split the Confederacy into two parts as it then controlled the Mississippi River too.

The Creole Culture of New Orleans. Creole culture in Louisiana is still strong. Creoles are primarily the people descended from the early French and Spanish settlers mixed with later German immigrants and African slaves. Creoles were originally white Europeans but the term later included mixed race people. When the Haitian Revolution led by slaves erupted in 1804 many French residents fled from Haiti to New Orleans with their African slaves. They reinforced the French culture of New Orleans and established their three tiered society of white Creoles, mixed race Creoles and black slaves. The mixed race Creoles were mainly fee black people and added to the free black population of New Orleans. French speakers dominated in New Orleans until 1830. But as late as 1900, 25% of residents spoke French and 75% could understand it. (250,000 Louisianans still speak French at home today.) Half the schools in New Orleans taught in French until the Civil War. In 1862 the Union occupier of the city General Butler abolished French instruction and enforced English teaching. The War made New Orleans an American city. But the Creoles did not disappear. They continued to dominate society for some time. The Creole planters along the Mississippi lived on their plantations during the hot malaria filled summers but moved to their French Quarter town houses for the cool winters. (It was the reverse in Charleston where the planters lived in Charleston in the hot summers and spent winters on their plantations.) The New Orleans winter was the time for balls and parties and the celebrations around Lent and the Mardi Gras activities, which still persist as a reminder of the French heritage of the city. The white French Creoles also often took black slave women as mistresses but unlike the white Americans they tended to give freedom to the children born from these unions. Thus New Orleans ended up with the largest number of free blacks of any Southern city in the Antebellum days. Mixed race Creoles had their own society balls and functions. Many had property and were quite wealthy in their own rights because of grants from their white Creole fathers. But their access to political and legal rights disappeared during the Jim Crow era as white Americans applied their white-black caste system on all parts of America including Louisiana. Free persons of colour were discriminated against by the Jim Crow regulations and segregation in New Orleans too. Change came with of the Civil Rights era.

Image taken from page 399 of ‘Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates’
african songs
Image by The British Library
Image taken from:

Title: "Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates"
Author: ANSORGE, William John.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10094.f.7."
Page: 399
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1899
Publisher: William Heinemann
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000092900

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‘Explore’.
Open the page in the British Library’s itemViewer (page image 399)
Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 399 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony – CSM Bronson – United States Army Africa – 090807
african songs
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa
Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony

Command Sergeant Major Gary J. Bronson
7 August 2009

Hoekstra Field, Caserma Ederle, Vicenza, Italy

Cleared for public release. The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson, U.S. Army Africa, PAO

Read More

Cool Morocco Tv images

Some cool morocco tv images:

Earth Information Day at COP22
morocco tv
Image by World Meteorological Organization
Earth Information Day at COP22

Earth Information Day at COP22
morocco tv
Image by World Meteorological Organization
Earth Information Day at COP22

Read More

Cool African Songs images

Check out these african songs images:

John Wesley Work Home at Fisk University
african songs
Image by SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent)
According to the historic marker:
In 1937, this Victorian-style house became the home of John W. Work III. A teacher and composer for 39 years, he served his alma mater by enriching the Fisk musical traditions. Director of the Jubilee Singers, Work III, a serious composer, completed more than 100 compositions. He was not only an acclaimed composer and choral conductor, but also a recognized author, educator and ethnomusicologist.

His father, John W. Work II, composer of the Fisk alma mater, "The Gold and Blue," was known as rescuer and preservationist of Negro religious music. Work II’s book, Folk Songs of the American Negro, was one of the first extensive studies on the origin and development of religious African-American music be a descendant of an ex-slave who lived during the time many of the songs has their beginnings.

Senegal Fast Food
african songs
Image by 10b travelling
Every time I drove past a restaurant with this offer I thought of Amadou & Mariam’s song "Senegal Fast Food"

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones “The Black Patti”
african songs
Image by roberthuffstutter
THIS IS NOT MY ART–THIS IS PUBLISHED FROM WIKIPEDIA FOR INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from The Black Patti)
"Black Patti" redirects here. For the record label, see Black Patti Records.
Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones

Background information
Birth nameMatilda Sissieretta Joyner
Also known asThe Black Patti
BornJanuary 5, 1868
Portsmouth, Virginia, U.S.
DiedJune 24, 1933 (aged 65)
Providence, Rhode Island
Genresgrand opera, light opera, popular music
Years active1887–1915

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, known as Sissieretta Jones, (January 5, 1868 or 1869[1] – June 24, 1933[2]) was an African-American soprano. She sometimes was called "The Black Patti" in reference to Italian opera singer Adelina Patti. Jones’ repertoire included grand opera, light opera, and popular music.[3]

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner was born in Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, to Jeremiah Malachi Joyner, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, and Henrietta Beale.[2] By 1876 her family moved to Providence, Rhode Island,[4] where she began singing at an early age in her father’s Pond Street Baptist Church.[2]
In 1883, Joyner began the formal study of music at the Providence Academy of Music. The same year she married David Richard Jones, a news dealer and hotel bellman. In the late 1880s, Jones was accepted at the New England Conservatory of Music.[1] In 1887, she performed at Boston’s Music Hall before an audience of 5,000.[2]

Jones made her New York debut on April 5, 1888, at Steinway Hall.[1] During a performance at Wallack’s Theater in New York, Jones came to the attention of Adelina Patti’s manager, who recommended that Jones tour the West Indies with the Fisk Jubilee Singers.[2] Jones made successful tours of the Caribbean in 1888 and 1892.[1]

In February 1892, Jones performed at the White House for President Benjamin Harrison.[2] She eventually sang for four consecutive presidents — Harrison, Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, and Theodore Roosevelt — and the British royal family.[1][2][3]

Jones in an 1889 poster[5]
Jones performed at the Grand Negro Jubilee at New York’s Madison Square Garden in April 1892 before an audience of 75,000. She sang the song "Swanee River" and selections from La traviata.[3] She was so popular that she was invited to perform at the Pittsburgh Exposition (1892) and the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893).[4]
In June 1892, Jones became the first African-American to sing at the Music Hall in New York (renamed Carnegie Hall the following year).[1][6] Among the selections in her program were Charles Gounod’s "Ave Maria" and Giuseppe Verdi’s "Sempre libera" (from La traviata).[1] The New York Echo wrote of her performance at the Music Hall: "If Mme Jones is not the equal of Adelina Patti, she at least can come nearer it than anything the American public has heard. Her notes are as clear as a mockingbird’s and her annunciation perfect."[1]
In 1893, Jones met composer Antonín Dvo?ák, and in January 1894 she performed parts of his Symphony No. 9 at Madison Square Garden. Dvo?ák wrote a solo part for Jones.[1]
Jones met with international success. Besides the United States and the West Indies, Jones toured in South America, Australia, India, and southern Africa.[1] During a European tour in 1895 and 1896, Jones performed in London, Paris, Berlin, Cologne, Munich, Milan, and Saint Petersburg.[7]

1898 newspaper advertisement for the Black Patti Troubadours

In 1896, Jones returned to Providence to care for her mother, who had become ill.[1] Jones found that access to most American classical concert halls was limited by racism. She formed the Black Patti Troubadours (later renamed the Black Patti Musical Comedy Company), a musical and acrobatic act made up of 40 jugglers, comedians, dancers and a chorus of 40 trained singers.[2]
The revue paired Jones with rising vaudeville composers Bob Cole and Billy Johnson. The show consisted of a musical skit, followed by a series of short songs and acrobatic performances. During the final third of each show, Jones performed arias and operatic excerpts.[7] The revue provided Jones with a comfortable income, reportedly in excess of ,000 per year. Several members of the troupe, such as Bert Williams, went on to become famous.[1]

Jones retired from performing in 1915. She devoted the remainder of her life to her church and to caring for her mother. Jones was forced to sell most of her property to survive.[1][2] She died penniless on June 24, 1933.[2]

Read More

Cool Breaking News images

Some cool breaking news images:

“Askew” – a sculpture by Roxy Paine at North Carolina Museum of Art
breaking news
Image by UGArdener
I spent a Saturday morning at the superb North Carolina Museum of Art. I hope to return several times, and to keep adding to a set that will show the range of the collections, the beautifully designed new building, and the outdoor sculpture park and greenway that connect it to North Carolina’s capitol city.

online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052748704895204575…

www.ncartmuseum.org/

ncartmuseum.org/untitled/2010/03/installing-askew/

"Askew is part of a series of works described by Roxy Paine as “dendroids,” treelike forms with elaborate branching structures. The monumental sculpture has been installed in the Museum’s south garden, adjacent to the main entrance of the new building and visible from numerous vantage points both inside and outside the Museum. As Paine has stated, “I’ve processed the idea of a tree and created a system for its form. I take this organic, majestic being and break it down into components and rules. The branches are translated into pipe and rod.”

Paine visited the Museum in April of 2007 to get a feel for the environment and prepare for his site-specific work. He brought his ideas back to his rural studio in Treadwell, New York, where he built the sculpture in sections, over the course of a year.

ncartmuseum.org/untitled/2009/05/building-roxy-paine/

BREAKING NEWS från #bokmassan
breaking news
Image by mirjoran

VISIONS: Seeing the Aurora in a New Light
breaking news
Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
On the night of Feb. 6, 2013, a green aurora appeared in the Alaskan night sky. Conditions were finally right to launch VISIONS.

Credit: NASA/Goddard/Chris Perry

To read more about the VISIONS mission go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sunearth/news/visions-aurora.html

VISIONS: Seeing the Aurora in a New Light

A team of NASA scientists arrived in Poker Flats, Alaska at the end of January, 2013. The team is patiently waiting for the exotic red and green glow of an aurora to illuminate the sky. Instead of simply admiring the view, this group from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center of Greenbelt, Md., and The Aerospace Corporation of El Segundo, Calif. will launch a sounding rocket up through the Northern Lights. The rocket could launch as early as the night of Feb. 2, 2013, but the team has a two-week window in order to find the perfect launch conditions.

Armed with a series of instruments developed specifically for this mission, the VISIONS (VISualizing Ion Outflow via Neutral atom imaging during a Substorm) rocket will soar high through the arctic sky to study the auroral wind, which is a strong but intermittent stream of oxygen atoms from Earth’s atmosphere into outer space. The rocket will survive only fifteen minutes before splashing down in the Arctic Ocean, but the information it obtains will provide answers to some long-standing questions.

VISIONS is studying how oxygen atoms leave Earth’s atmosphere under the influence of the aurora. Most of the atmosphere is bound by Earth’s gravity, but a small portion of it gets heated enough by the aurora that it can break free, flowing outwards until it reaches near-Earth space. The atoms that form this wind initially travel at about 300 miles per hour — only one percent of the speed needed to overcome gravity and leave Earth’s atmosphere.

The principal investigator for VISIONS, Goddard’s Doug Rowland is providing images while the team prepares for launch.

VISIONS is a partnership between NASA Goddard and the Aerospace Corporation of El Segundo, Calif. The sounding rocket motors and payload support systems are provided by NASA Wallops Flight Facility, including NSROC, the NASA Sounding Rocket Operations Contract. The Poker Flat Research Range is operated by the University of Alaska under contract to NASA.

NASA image use policy.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.

Follow us on Twitter

Like us on Facebook

Find us on Instagram

Read More

Cool News Live images

Some cool news live images:

strange way for celebs to exit
news live
Image by brizzle born and bred
Not that you need to think about it, but if you do, you’ll see that money and glory won’t make you live happily ever after. Some of the most bizarre deaths happened to those who had it all. Money, fame, men or women, TV time, radio time, red carpet appearances and also very strange ends.

It seems they just managed to live their lives to the fullest before leaving under strange circumstances. One thing is for sure, money and fame could not save them.

Natalie Wood (born Natalia Nikolaevna Zacharenko; July 20, 1938 – November 29, 1981) was an American film and television actress best known for her screen roles in Miracle on 34th Street, Splendor in the Grass, Rebel Without a Cause, and West Side Story. After first working in films as a child, Wood became a successful Hollywood star as a young adult, receiving three Academy Award nominations before she was 25 years old.

At age 43, Wood drowned near Santa Catalina Island, California at the time her last film, Brainstorm (1983), was in production with co-star Christopher Walken. Her death was declared an accident for 31 years; in 2012 after a new investigation the cause was reclassified as "undetermined".

Death

During the making of her last film Brainstorm, Wood drowned while on a weekend boat trip to Santa Catalina Island, California, with her husband Robert Wagner, Brainstorm co-star Christopher Walken, and the boat’s captain, Dennis Davern. Many facts surrounding her drowning are unknown, because no one admitted seeing how she entered the water. Wood’s body was discovered by authorities at 8 am on November 29, 1981, one mile away from the boat, with a small inflatable dinghy found beached nearby. According to Wagner, when he went to bed, Wood was not there. The autopsy report revealed that Wood had bruises on her body and arms as well as an abrasion on her left cheek.

Later, in his book Pieces of My Heart, Wagner acknowledged that he had had a fight with Wood before she had disappeared. The autopsy also found that Wood’s blood alcohol level was 0.14%, and there were traces of two types of medication in her bloodstream: a motion-sickness pill and a painkiller, which increase the effects of alcohol. Following his investigation, Los Angeles County coroner Thomas Noguchi ruled her death an accident by drowning and hypothermia. According to the coroner, Wood had been drinking and may have slipped while trying to re-board the dinghy.

The case was reopened in November 2011 after the captain of the boat, Dennis Davern, told NBC News that he had lied to police during the initial investigation and that Wood and Wagner had had a fight that evening, and alleged that Wagner was responsible for her death.

Audio recordings were found in 2012 providing what would seem to be additional evidence toward that end. After nine months of further investigation, Los Angeles County Chief Medical Examiner, Dr. Lakshmanan Sathyavagiswaran, amended Wood’s death certificate and changed the cause of her death from accidental drowning to "drowning and other undetermined factors". The amended document includes a statement that the circumstances of how Wood ended up in the water are "not clearly established". The coroner’s office has been instructed by detectives not to discuss or comment on the case.

Wood was buried in Westwood Village Memorial Park Cemetery. Scores of representatives of international media, photographers, and members of the public tried to attend Wood’s funeral; however, all were required to remain outside the cemetery walls. Among the celebrity attendees were Frank Sinatra, Elizabeth Taylor, Fred Astaire, Rock Hudson, David Niven, Gregory Peck, Gene Kelly, Elia Kazan and Sir Laurence Olivier. Olivier flew from London to Los Angeles to attend the service.

On January 14, 2013, the Los Angeles County coroner’s office offered a 10-page addendum to Wood’s autopsy report stating that some of the bruises on her body may have been sustained before she went into the water and drowned, but that could not be definitively determined.

Douglas Trumbull, director of Brainstorm, quit directing after Wood’s death in 1981. In 2013, he explained that the uncertain circumstances of her death were the main reason for this decision. He has since decided to return to film making.

2014 Owner of yacht which Natalie Wood died on 28 years ago puts it up for sale claiming it’s ‘haunted’ by West Side Story star

The owner of the yacht where Natalie Wood spent her final moments has put it on the market after claiming the actress still haunts the decks.

Ron Nelson bought The Splendour in 1986, five years after the West Side Story actress mysteriously drowned off the coast of Catalina Island.

But now, 28 years later, he has revealed the force of Wood’s spirit is too strong, forcing him to get rid of it altogether.

The numerous ‘supernatural’ incidents include a number of ‘weird falls’, he told the National Enquirer.

‘It’s just like my feet came out from under me and I fell,’ he explained.

Another time a being sat on his bed: ‘Something sat down on the bed and then left.’

And during the recent Hurricane Ana, The Splendour became suspiciously waterlogged, he said.

In 2011, Nelson, a former United Airlines flight attendant, admitted to Hawaii’s KITV.com that ‘there’s been a lot of strange things that have happened on the boat.’

He even had the yacht blessed by two Hawaiian kahunas – a kind of shaman – to clean teh boat’s spirit.

But despite his efforts, he says, it is unbearable.

He hopes a museum will buy The Splendour to preserve it.
The stateroom contains many of the same tiles, the same blue bed remains in exactly the same spot and the initials WW are still etched into the captain’s seat.

Nelson bought the boat from Robert Wagner, Wood’s husband.

He carried out small renovations, before taking two friends on a trip to Catalina Island, where the actress died. He said it was a ‘last goodbye to Natalie’.

Afterwards, they made the two week trip to Hawaii where he has spent 10 years restoring the boat. He said he was now almost ready to begin chartering voyages.

He said he tried to keep his makeover as close to the original as possible, and has kept the stateroom with the blue bed, dubbed ‘Natalie’s Room’, and most of the tiles.

The initials WW are still etched onto the captain’s seat, just as they were when Wagner and Natalie owned the boat.

Nelson said the 60ft boat’s history was one of the reasons why he bought it, and told Hawaii’s KITV.com said: ‘I have read pretty much every article ever written about her death.’

41062-012: Mainstreaming Environment for Poverty Reduction in the Philippines
news live
Image by Asian Development Bank
Squatters continue to live atop Smokey Mountain despite health concerns regarding its unsanitary environment.

Video: Recycling Profits the Poor in Philippines

Read more on:
Philippines
Environment
Social Development and Poverty
Mainstreaming Environment for Poverty Reduction

Read More

Cool News images

Check out these news images:

Coffee & news
news
Image by jgbarah
Technically poor, but I couldn’t resist maybe the mix, maybe the colors, I don’t really know what.

blind-news
news
Image by openDemocracy
Thanks to redjar for the original photo

The original

News Stand
news
Image by ?uri

Read More

Cool Casablanca Hotels images

Check out these casablanca hotels images:

Casablanca Hotel
casablanca hotels
Image by etselecsg

volubilis-hotel
casablanca hotels
Image by mararie
may 2012. art deco city walk in casablanca, morocco

2011-11 Brazil 043
casablanca hotels
Image by Edmund Nigel Gall
Accident opposite Hotel Casablanca

Read More

Cool Breaking News images

Some cool breaking news images:

lois with breaking news
breaking news
Image by Joelk75
For a blog entry.

Read More

Cool Morocco images

Some cool morocco images:

Alleyway
morocco
Image by Hernan Piñera

Cleaning
morocco
Image by zilverbat.
en.flickeflu.com/photos/25228175@N08

Towards Jbel Toubkal
morocco
Image by John D F

Read More