Image from page 222 of “The sanitary news : healthy homes and healthy living : a weekly journal of sanitary science” (1886)

A few nice live news images I found:

Image from page 222 of “The sanitary news : healthy homes and healthy living : a weekly journal of sanitary science” (1886)
live news
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: sanitarynewsheal08chic
Title: The sanitary news : healthy homes and healthy living : a weekly journal of sanitary science
Year: 1886 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Sanitation Sanitation
Publisher: Chicago : The Sanitary News
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and the National Endowment for the Humanities

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Text Appearing Before Image:
s-pool, a sump and a catch basin,whose interior, in the absence of any special ar-rangements, can never be fully flushed, butmust of necessity be foui in an unnecessary de-gree. The air vent shown in this sketch ren-ders liable the Ireezing of the water seal belowin cold climates, and, unless carefully protected,occasional stoppages by snow. As to the drain tothe sewer, below thehouse trap, the venti-lation that is so stren-uously urged for everytrap and pipe above istotally ignored, and,between a considerablepressure of the air andgases of the public sew-er and the whole in-terior of the housedrainage system andthe air currents intothe doors and windowsas well, through the air pipe, nothing is in-terposed but a hatful of filthy water, perhaps aninch and a half in depth of seal, if undisturbed. Now, turning to house Fig. 2, let us suppose aflushing trap at B, a horizontal air pipe betweenthe joists of the first floor above, C extendingup by a four-inch vent pipe, or rain-water lead- 1

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 3.in a trap, or just below it, before sudden andeasy relief is had by the shorter route to the er, above the roof, and no trap at A. Throughthe air pipe as shown the air will be forciblydrawn into the soil-pipe at frequent intervals, 2l8 THE SANITARY NEWS. [Vol. VIII, No. 134 while the drain below to the sewer will be I dinary displacement of air within its own length,flushed in a way that will speedily disclose any \ when no unpleasant results will ensue. In House Fig. 4 is shown anadmirable system of house drain-age, not perhaps generally appli-cable to buildings in the closely-built districts of the large cities,but which can be applied to manyhomes throughout their suburbs,and quite generally to houses inthe residence portions of cities,towns and villages, and in thecountry. As far as the ventilation of thesystem is concerned, it will beimproved by applying the prin-

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Mount Saint Helens, 1994. Biking up to Johnston Ridge
live news
Image by theslowlane
Memories from the eruption.

Where my sisters were living, it was one of those first really nice spring days of the year in Pullman, Washington, about 265 miles east of the volcano. People were coming home from church, working in the garden and planning to eat dinner out on the deck when a huge black cloud started to appear on the horizon.

It was ash from Mt. St. Helens, but most people didn’t know it, unless they had the news on. The cloud got bigger and bigger until it shut out the sun, but it wasn’t really a storm. No rain or wind, just darkness. With in an hour, or two, that sunny afternoon was transformed into the dark of night. Street lights came on. It was as black as midnight.

Meanwhile, here in Bellingham, where I was, I didn’t know what was happening. It was a typical spring day over here, even though Bellingham is a little closer to the mountain than Pullman. The wind carried the ash to the east. Eventually, I heard the news on TV and I felt cheated that I was missing the excitement. Life in most of Western Washington was deceptively normal.

Then the radio reported that people had heard the blast as far away as Vancouver, BC. about 50 miles farther from the mountain than Bellingham. I tried to remember what I was doing, at that moment, and realized I had heard the blast also. It sounded like someone was trying to break into my place of work as the front door was being pushed against and rattling on its hinges. At the time, I didn’t pay that much attention as no one was at the door, but later I realized it was shock waves from Mt. St. Helens.

The night after the eruption, my sister Lillian called me from Pullman, phones were still working. She said she didn’t know when she was going to see the sun again. It was a spooky feeling, but next day, the sun did come out. The hazy sunshine revealed a gritty world. It looked like everything was covered in talcum powder. Every time someone tried to walk out doors, or even worse drive, it would kick up a cloud that would obscure visibility. Schools had to close for the rest of the season, business ground to a halt, the grit did damage to any cars that tried to drive in it.

Unlike a big snow fall, which eventually melts away, this stuff had to be shoveled up and hauled away. It took months for the clean up, but Pullman’s people remember the event with great fondness. They got to witness geology in action.

Here in Bellingham, I missed most of the action, but, in 1986 and again in 1994, I bicycled into the Mt. St. Helens area. Under this tag are some images of the devastation as seen from Windy Ridge on the east in 1986 and Johnston Ridge on the west in 1994.

Challenger 2 Tank Live Firing During Exercise
live news
Image by Defence Images
A Challenger 2 main battle tank (MBT) is pictured during a live firing exercise in Grafenwöhr, Germany.

Exercise BAVARIAN CHARGER was the first of three large contingency operation exercises being undertaken by 20th Armoured Brigade between May – October 2013. Contingency Operations training is known as Hybrid Foundation Training or HFT.

The aim of this exercise was to train the 5 Rifles, The Queens Dragoon Guards (QDG) Battle Groups and 1 Logistic Support Regiment in combined arms manoeuvre.

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© Crown Copyright 2013
Photographer: Cpl Wes Calder RLC
Image 45155718.jpg from www.defenceimages.mod.uk

This image is available for high resolution download at www.defenceimagery.mod.uk subject to the terms and conditions of the Open Government License at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/. Search for image number 45155718.jpg

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