Category Music

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John Wesley Work Home at Fisk University
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Image by SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent)
According to the historic marker:
In 1937, this Victorian-style house became the home of John W. Work III. A teacher and composer for 39 years, he served his alma mater by enriching the Fisk musical traditions. Director of the Jubilee Singers, Work III, a serious composer, completed more than 100 compositions. He was not only an acclaimed composer and choral conductor, but also a recognized author, educator and ethnomusicologist.

His father, John W. Work II, composer of the Fisk alma mater, "The Gold and Blue," was known as rescuer and preservationist of Negro religious music. Work II’s book, Folk Songs of the American Negro, was one of the first extensive studies on the origin and development of religious African-American music be a descendant of an ex-slave who lived during the time many of the songs has their beginnings.

Senegal Fast Food
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Image by 10b travelling
Every time I drove past a restaurant with this offer I thought of Amadou & Mariam’s song "Senegal Fast Food"

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones “The Black Patti”
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Image by roberthuffstutter
THIS IS NOT MY ART–THIS IS PUBLISHED FROM WIKIPEDIA FOR INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from The Black Patti)
"Black Patti" redirects here. For the record label, see Black Patti Records.
Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones

Background information
Birth nameMatilda Sissieretta Joyner
Also known asThe Black Patti
BornJanuary 5, 1868
Portsmouth, Virginia, U.S.
DiedJune 24, 1933 (aged 65)
Providence, Rhode Island
Genresgrand opera, light opera, popular music
Years active1887–1915

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, known as Sissieretta Jones, (January 5, 1868 or 1869[1] – June 24, 1933[2]) was an African-American soprano. She sometimes was called "The Black Patti" in reference to Italian opera singer Adelina Patti. Jones’ repertoire included grand opera, light opera, and popular music.[3]

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner was born in Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, to Jeremiah Malachi Joyner, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, and Henrietta Beale.[2] By 1876 her family moved to Providence, Rhode Island,[4] where she began singing at an early age in her father’s Pond Street Baptist Church.[2]
In 1883, Joyner began the formal study of music at the Providence Academy of Music. The same year she married David Richard Jones, a news dealer and hotel bellman. In the late 1880s, Jones was accepted at the New England Conservatory of Music.[1] In 1887, she performed at Boston’s Music Hall before an audience of 5,000.[2]

Jones made her New York debut on April 5, 1888, at Steinway Hall.[1] During a performance at Wallack’s Theater in New York, Jones came to the attention of Adelina Patti’s manager, who recommended that Jones tour the West Indies with the Fisk Jubilee Singers.[2] Jones made successful tours of the Caribbean in 1888 and 1892.[1]

In February 1892, Jones performed at the White House for President Benjamin Harrison.[2] She eventually sang for four consecutive presidents — Harrison, Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, and Theodore Roosevelt — and the British royal family.[1][2][3]

Jones in an 1889 poster[5]
Jones performed at the Grand Negro Jubilee at New York’s Madison Square Garden in April 1892 before an audience of 75,000. She sang the song "Swanee River" and selections from La traviata.[3] She was so popular that she was invited to perform at the Pittsburgh Exposition (1892) and the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893).[4]
In June 1892, Jones became the first African-American to sing at the Music Hall in New York (renamed Carnegie Hall the following year).[1][6] Among the selections in her program were Charles Gounod’s "Ave Maria" and Giuseppe Verdi’s "Sempre libera" (from La traviata).[1] The New York Echo wrote of her performance at the Music Hall: "If Mme Jones is not the equal of Adelina Patti, she at least can come nearer it than anything the American public has heard. Her notes are as clear as a mockingbird’s and her annunciation perfect."[1]
In 1893, Jones met composer Antonín Dvo?ák, and in January 1894 she performed parts of his Symphony No. 9 at Madison Square Garden. Dvo?ák wrote a solo part for Jones.[1]
Jones met with international success. Besides the United States and the West Indies, Jones toured in South America, Australia, India, and southern Africa.[1] During a European tour in 1895 and 1896, Jones performed in London, Paris, Berlin, Cologne, Munich, Milan, and Saint Petersburg.[7]

1898 newspaper advertisement for the Black Patti Troubadours

In 1896, Jones returned to Providence to care for her mother, who had become ill.[1] Jones found that access to most American classical concert halls was limited by racism. She formed the Black Patti Troubadours (later renamed the Black Patti Musical Comedy Company), a musical and acrobatic act made up of 40 jugglers, comedians, dancers and a chorus of 40 trained singers.[2]
The revue paired Jones with rising vaudeville composers Bob Cole and Billy Johnson. The show consisted of a musical skit, followed by a series of short songs and acrobatic performances. During the final third of each show, Jones performed arias and operatic excerpts.[7] The revue provided Jones with a comfortable income, reportedly in excess of ,000 per year. Several members of the troupe, such as Bert Williams, went on to become famous.[1]

Jones retired from performing in 1915. She devoted the remainder of her life to her church and to caring for her mother. Jones was forced to sell most of her property to survive.[1][2] She died penniless on June 24, 1933.[2]

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guitars

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EPSON DSC Picture

smoothed
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Nice African Songs photos

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RIver of soul – Marcomé – New World Music
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Image by Marcome : Ambient New Age Music
River of Soul is the second New World music album by Marcomé.
This pivotal sophomore release successfully fuses the dreaminess of New Age music, the sultriness of World and boasts an exotic palette of Latin sounds, Middle-Eastern instrumentation, jazz and African rhythms.

get your free songs at www.Marcome.com

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Nokia 5800 Xpress Music

Nokia 5800 Sim Free

As a true member of the Xpress Music series, the Nokia Xpress 5800 aims for the music lovers. It is one of the first Nokia devices that supports the innovative â??Comes with Musicâ?? service, which allows users to have a full access to music downloads for a year. The device features all those characteristics that will allow the users to enjoy their favourite music on the go.

The 5800 comes with a vast in built memory of 8GB expandable up to 16GB, great sound quality and easy access to all the main features. Nokia 5800 will enable the users to store more than 6000 music files, listen to them using the 3.5 jack and ensure superb quality with equalizer and audio surround.

Following the example of its competitors Nokia allows its users to access the Nokia Music Store, downloading albums, singles or simple mp3 files for their phone. Using the new software, Nokia Music PC for the personal computers, the users can achieve the perfect synchronization of their PC and mobile phone with a simple drag and drop.

The New Nokia 5800 Xpress Music is a device that boasts a resistive touch screen, with a selection of input methods. Users can choose from finger touch, stylus or plectrum, while there are some amazing features on, such as a handwriting recognition and mini QWERTY keyboard.

Thanks to the quite small size, the Nokia 5800 Xpress Music reminds us more of a candy bar phone than a typical rectangle smart phone. It comes at 111 x 51.7 x 15.5 mm and 102gr. The main advantage of this shape and size is that it gives people the chance to use it with one hand; this is actually very practical for those who want to enjoy its amazing features on the go. Combined with the hand shake control the 5800 seems a really practical and flexible device.

The Nokia 5800 XpressMusic boasts a 3.2 megapixel camera with an amazing Carl Zeiss lens; users can share their images and videos with friends online in Facebook or FlickR.  They also have the chance to share their favourite music using the in built Bluetooth, the online sharing abilities and of course the regular MMS application. 

Nokia promised music for the masses and it seems that it managed to do so, introducing the 5800 Sim Free XpressMusic. Sleek design, flexibility and a vast array of specifications in Sim Free mode, with no contract limitations and restrictions: What more can a modern user ask from a mobile phone?

I live and work in the South East of England I am married with 4 children. I am the publisher of several websites my latest being Sim Card & mobile phones

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Podcast Safe Music

Podcasting is the new thing in broadcasting nowadays. Practically anyone can create his own podcast and make himself known to the world. Perhaps the best thing about podcasting is that it is meant to be free. In addition to that, podcasts transcend the boundaries of traditional broadcasting. You may be from the US but anyone with access to the internet can listen to your podcast. A person may be in Timbuktu and yet have access to your podcast.


Music is inherent to the success of any podcast. It adds spice and flavor to an otherwise bland broadcast. That is why a large pool of resources has been developed by people in the podcasting community. Beginners and veterans a like search for the perfect background music or filler sounds for every podcast they make. So how do you go about looking for that spice?


Despite the freedom provided by podcasting, there are some issues you must address before jumping into the bandwagon and creating your own podcast. Copyright and intellectual property rights have been a main concern in all aspects of broadcasting for some time now and podcasting is not exempt from that. As a result, the term podsafe has come into existence. What exactly is podsafe? This term encompasses any material that may be used for podcasts without violating any copyright or license. A special thing about podsafe material is that the very same material might require some sort of license in other media but totally safe for podcasting. Due to the open community nature of podcasting, many songs, music, and other type of materials are allowed to be used for free exclusively for podcasts. While you might have to acquire the permission of the copyright holder for other broadcasting media, with podsafe material, you can use it freely in podcasts.


Some specific kinds of work are inherently podsafe. Works that fall under the public domain or some works with Creative Commons licenses can be used in podcasts without any issues. They are meant to be used, and used freely.


There are some entities on the web that license music especially for podcasts. Their podcast safe music is generally available to anyone for downloading and for use in free broadcasts over the internet. The only restriction they have is for the user to duly acknowledge the source. Anyone may also post music on their sites as long as the piece of work is totally original.


Some sites make their music available for no fee at all. On the other hand there are sites which promote artists â?? particularly independent ones â?? and charge a small fee for downloading their songs. Notably, these sites also offer labeled artists and are supposed to split the downloading fees with them.


The important thing to bear in mind when looking for podcast safe music is that most of the groups offering materials make them available to the general public for free. The caveat is that your podcast must not be used for commercial purposes. If that is the case, then you will have no problems finding the right track for your podcast.

Podcastblaster.com supplies a complete podcasting solution including podcast safe music and tips on creating podcasts.

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Let Music Convey: Background Music

Music is universal and music is impactful. It is very difficult to remain absolutely inert to the soothing and addictive effect of music. It is sometimes the words of the composition, sometimes the mood of the composition, or may be even sometimes exclusively the melody and rhythm that appeal to one. It therefore becomes not just a piece of composition but actually a means of venting and articulation, a release for both the composer and the listener. The background music in fact adds to an otherwise mundane occasion or happening. It kind of pulls up the value and impact of the respective occurrence of situation in whichever form or content it may be placed. The new bands that are emerging with the broadening of scopes also have a significant contribution to make pertaining to the same.

The background music in fact has no specifications as far as the area of usage is concerned. It can be utilized in all or any as per the requirement and the relevance. The music in the backdrop actually enhances the impact on the viewer or listener. It can bring about a remarkable change in the reaction of the audience in the same given framework. It has the catalyst effect that triggers the escalation of both pace and progress. The usage of this type of music can be used for any kind of occasion. All that one needs to keep in mind is that the appropriateness and relevance of the background music is taken care of.

The background music need not always refer to the instrumental music that is playing in the backdrop of some occasion. The performance of the new bands can also provide the perfect backdrop music to an occasion be it personal or professional. The business concerns have quite a number of parties. Either for the purpose of advertisement or product launching or even attracting prospective clients with lucrative opportunities any of them can call for a professional gathering. It is but obvious that the individual in charge of the arranging the entire occasion is under too much pressure to have the adequate time to go through all the different types of music and select the best of the lot.

Under such circumstances the new bands come in to the scenario. In case they give an impressive performance and the clients are pleased with the concern, both the concern and the band is benefitted. The concern gets the deal and the band gets the exposure and the platform to excel and establish. The background music plays an integral part as far as the success or failure of the party is concerned. It can be an ideal way to make the client feel pampered and spoilt. It makes them feel important and thereby in return drives the decision of the deal in favor of the concern.

However since the background music plays such an important role the selection of the right band among numerous new bands is very essential. After all it is the prudent and informative decision that pays off rich dividends for the rest if the life.

Daina Smith is a music lover. She has good knowledge on background music. For more information on new bands she recommends to visit http://www.musicdealers.com/.

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MLK Tribute

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MLK Tribute
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Image by jurvetson
Bono working the camera up close….

In the middle of Pride (In the Name of Love), Bono rolls into a characteristic political message mid-song:

“This dream is not just an American Dream.
It’s also an Irish dream.
A European dream. An African dream. An Israeli dream.
[multi-beat pause] Also a Palestinian dream.”

and then the Edge drops into his favorite guitar riff…

ST 24 47
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Image by Jim Surkamp
STORY 24 – THE CRATER CLIMAX 1:47:44

This post corresponds to the portion of the video called Jasper Thompson’s Destiny Day that begins at 1:47:44 (hour-minutes-seconds)
youtu.be/4LJpJeIwFMw#t=1h47m44s
THE FULL VIDEO FROM THE BEGINNING
youtu.be/4LJpJeIwFMw

The illustrated story:
civilwarscholars.com/2017/03/jasper-thompsons-destiny-day…

Robert K. Beecham a white Wisconsin-born officer for the 23rd wrote they had recruited some “pretty hard cases” in Baltimore and Washington, but:

As a rule the men were sober, honest, patriotic and willing to learn and fulfill the duties of soldiers. . . The 2nd Wisconsin was not as sober and temperate as the 23rd U.S. Colored Troops, (in fact) there was never an organization of 1,000 men in all this broad, free America where a woman was held in greater esteem or her honor more sacred.” Beecham added the men “were not filthy, rather the opposite and “for that reason if for no other, I would prefer to command a company of regiment of black, rather than white soldiers.”

The 23rd resumed escorting the infinite train of wagons to the front and returning with wounded to the ships at Belle Plain, facing ambushes en route.

J. Rickard wrote:

There were not ambulances enough for the emergency, and the baggage wagons had to be used. The roads were very rough; it was a most pitiful situation, the shrieks and groans of the men, as the

wheels would strike stumps or sink suddenly into holes in the deep ruts which had been formed. It was necessary to have a strong guard all the way with the teams, to prevent surprise and capture of the trains.

Capt. James H. Rickard wrote of the 19th regiment on the volume of provisions needed:

I shall never forget a sight I beheld that morning. The cattle for the Ninth Corps were herded in a valley a mile or two in diameter, and they completely filled it, and at sunrise it was a magnificent sight as I beheld them from an eminence near by. . . .

Before crossing the James they were all eaten. This gives something of an idea what it took to supply provisions for such an army.

The first sight for central Virginians of black men in blue coats with muskets and bayonets drew violence,

consternation, fear or sublime joy for those enslaved. Their Redeemer had arrived.

Wrote Sergeant John C. Brock:

The slaves come flocking to us from every part of the country. You see them coming in every direction, some in carts, some on their master’s horses,

and great numbers on foot, carrying their bundles on their heads. They manifest their love for liberty by every possible emotion.
As several of them remarked to me, it seemed to them like heaven, so greatly did they realize the difference between slavery and freedom.

They were all sent to White House Landing in wagons. From hence they are to be taken to Washington in transports.

We have been instrumental in liberating some five hundred (152) of our brothers and sisters and brethren from the accursed yoke of human bondage

June, 1864 – Pvt. William Johnson of the 23rd confessed his guilt to the charges of desertion and rape and was executed within the outer breast works at Petersburg, on an elevation, and in plain view of the enemy, a white flag covering the ceremony. The site is near where the current visitor center sits.

Wrote blogger historian James Price:

June 15-18, 1864 – 23rd participates in the opening battles outside of Petersburg. Rebels under P.G.T. Beauregard hold on to the city, however, and a siege begins. The 23rd is engaged in building fortifications until late June.

In July, Gen. Burnside’s proposed mine attack against the Confederate lines along the Jerusalem Plank Road was underway.

“Towards the end of the digging, members of the 23rd United States Colored Troops were employed to carry dirt from the mine in sacks.

They also hauled timber to the gallery [of the mine] for framing its sides.”

On the Eve of the Battle of the Crater – July 29th, 1864:

Music notation of the song the African American troops sang to prepare for battle written down by Henry Gordon Thomas.

The black men in blue were in high spirits on the eve of the battle outside Petersburg. But when Gen. Thomas told them higher-ups took away their planned position as the leading attack division – the African-American division – of the four – they stopped singing that song.

Henry G. Thomas:
Until we fought the battle of the crater they sang this song (563) every night to the exclusion of all other songs. After that defeat they sang it no more.

About 3 AM, the morning of the battle we were up after a short sleep under arms. Then came the soldiers’ hasty breakfast. ” This morning our breakfast was much like that on other mornings when we could not make fires: two pieces of hard-tack with a slice of raw, fat salt pork between, not a dainty meal, but solid provender to fight on. And black coffee.

Rickard

When all preparations were made, we lay down for a little sleep, and were awakened

shortly after daylight by the explosion and the terrible discharge of cannon, that made the ground tremble as by an earthquake.

Thomas:
At 4:45 came a dull, heavy thud, not at all startling;

it was a heavy, smothered sound, (but) here was a mine blown up, making a crater from 150 to 200 feet long, 60 feet wide, and 30 feet deep,

Rickard

The First Division only went as far as the crater and stopped, and it was nearly an hour before the colored troops were ordered in, having been standing crowded in the covered ways leading up to the breastworks.

Montage: Federal divisions jammed around the Crater, face fire from both sides in the breastworks, and artillery to the right and front, and seek safety in the crater.

The First Division of white soldiers advanced with little opposition but jammed in the narrow, six foot passageway beside the crater, unable to advance. The 2nd Division, now under fire became stuck similarly and were being fired upon from along the breastworks and artillery in front,

driving them for the safety inside the crater. The same occurred with the 3rd Division of white soldiers. Their orders did not anticipate the jam in the passageways and close range gunfire

and their commander Gen. Ledlie who commanded the lead division was not there.

The Charge of the USCT 23rd to the Crater

Hurd remembered that “it seemed [to take] forever [to move forward]. The whole [division]…filed through a single parallel…

we were hindered by officers and orderlies coming to the rear, the parallel being only six feet wide.” – Diary of Warren H. Hurd, 30 July 1864, Private Collection

Thomas:

The crater was already too full; that I could easily see. . . My brigade moved gallantly on right over the bomb-proofs and over the men of the First Division & as we mounted the pits, a deadly enfilade from eight guns on our right and a murderous cross-fire of musketry met us. Among the officers, the first to fall was the gallant Fessenden of the 23d Regiment

Zelotis Fessenden

John Hackhiser

William Flint

H.H. Aiken

Theodore Rockwood

. . . Liscomb of the 23d then fell to rise no more; and then Hackhiser of the 28th and Flint and Aiken of the 29th. Major Rockwood of the 19th then mounted the crest and fell back dead, with a cheer on his lips.

Nor were these all; for at that time hundreds of heroes “carved in ebony” fell. These black men commanded the admiration and respect of everyone who beheld. (564)

(565)
About eight hundred feet from the crater, having been reached, we leaped from the works and endeavored to make a rush for the crest. . . .

Lieutenant Christopher Pennell, hastened down the line outside the pits. With his sword uplifted in his right hand and the banner in his left, he sought to call out the men along the whole line of the parapet. In a moment, a musketry fire was focused upon him, whirling him round and round several times before he fell. . . (and he

probably sleeps among the unknown whom we buried (unrecognized) in the long deep trench we dug.)

ize-medium wp-image-17393? />After being driven back into the crater, Thomas reorganized his men and followed orders to charge and capture the Confederates at the crest.

Thomas:
I then directed the commanders of the 23d, 28th, and 20th regiments to get their commands . . . together. As I gave the order, Lieutenant-Colonel John A. Bross, taking the flag into his own hands, was the first man to leap from the works into the valley of death below. He had attired himself in full uniform, evidently with the intent of inspiring his men.

John A. Bross 1826-1864
findagrave.com
www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=127971314
fold3.com
www.fold3.comsearch/#query=John+A.+Bross&preview=1&am…

Memorial of Colonel John A. Bross, Twenty-Ninth U.S. Colored Troops, Who Fell in Leading the Assault on Petersburgh, July 30, 1864.
content.wisconsinhistory.org 20 October 2003 Web. 10 February 2017.
content.wisconsinhistory.org/cdm/ref/collection/tp/id/55643

He had hardly reached the ground outside the works before he fell to rise no more. He was conspicuous and magnificent in his gallantry. The black men followed into the jaws of death, and advanced until met by a charge in force from the Confederate lines. (566)

The 23rd charged forward but could not get past the crater itself.

Lt. Beecham remembered of the crater:

Pvt. George Washington – Henry Kurtz Collection – USAMHI.

“The black men formed up promptly. There was no flinching on their part. They came to the shoulder like true soldiers, as ready to face the enemy and meet death on the field as the bravest and best soldiers that ever lived.”

John Elder’s famous painting of the 12th Virginia

Beecham and the rest of the 23rd held a portion of the crater until around 2 p.m. when the Confederates counterattacked and swept over them, killing many men who were attempting to surrender.

The 23rd sustained the heaviest losses of the entire Fourth Division.

Of this last scene in the battle the Confederate General Bushrod R. Johnson says in his official report:

I proceeded to concert a combined movement on both flanks of the crater.
A third charge a little before 2 PM gave us entire possession of the crater and adjacent lines.

These movements were all conducted by General Mahone, while I took the 22d and 23d South Carolina into the crater and captured three colors and 130 prisoners.

Thomas:

One little band, after my second charge was repulsed, defended the entrenchments we had won from the enemy, exhibiting fighting qualities that I never saw surpassed in the war. This handful stood there without the slightest organization of company or regiment, each man for himself, until the enemy’s banners waved in their very faces. Then they made a dash for our own lines, and that at my order.

B&L 2 p. 675 two image charging line and firing line

It was now too late, as their second line of works was full of men, brought up from each flank, and our men were not only exposed to the terrible musketry fire in front, but to an enfilading fire of shell, grape and canister that no troops could withstand, and the charge was made through a line of white troops going to the rear. The slaughter was terrible….

Gen. H. G. Thomas, who commanded a brigade of colored troops at Petersburg says:
“I lost in all thirty-six officers and eight hundred seventy-seven men; total, nine hundred and thirteen. The Twenty-third Regiment entered at the charge with eighteen officers, it came out with seven. The Twenty-eighth entered with eleven officers, it came out with four. The Thirty-first had but two officers for duty that night.
Had the colored troops led the assault, their subsequent attack proved they would have led the way clear through the enemy’s entire line, on to Cemetery Hill, and the other troops would have followed, and the awful slaughter by an enfilading fire at the crater been prevented.

Hereafter let no man say that black troops, led by graduates of Harvard and Yale, and the sons of the first families of the North, will not fight.

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Nice African Songs photos

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75_and no wonder his coat had an empty sleeve
african songs
Image by Jim Surkamp
Hamilton Hatter’s Tense Charles Town, WV 1865-1867 – While the ruins are still smoking

Transcript from Video
youtu.be/YqCZlSMFVCs TRT: 26:58

With generous, community-minded support from American Public University System. (The sentiments in this production do not in any way reflect modern-day policies of APUS). More at apus.edu

1_Mother of thine stone fountains
Mother of thine stone fountains; my heart goes back with the setting sun; my heart, my heart is in the mountains. (piano).

2_The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter
The “Most Excellent” Hamilton Hatter (1856-1942) Part 1 (music)

3_Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia
Once enslaved near Charlestown, Virginia, Hamilton Hatter

4_seizes opportunities to learn and overcome
seizes opportunities to learn and overcome. At one college he builds young minds and even its buildings –

5_then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia
then launches another college in his beloved West Virginia again building minds and buildings.

6_Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues
Hatter’s descendant Joyceann Gray continues: The third event that I’d like to share with you from the Hatter family history is about Hamilton Hatter. Hamilton is the son of Rebecca and Franklin Hatter and he was born in 1856. Hamilton was a very industrious young man and did everything he could in order to make money because his desire was to gain an education He learned to do house framing, make plows – he was very, very handy. (music) But first he had to overcome.

7_But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.
But first he had to overcome. Overcoming in Hamilton Hatter’s Charlestown, Va. – 1865 to 1867.

8_His almost savage answers did not move me
His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

9_and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON
"and I can rejoice now in the belief that THE SCHOOL WILL GO ON!” (music)

10_The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age
The children were of both sexes, ranging from three to twenty years of age, neatly and comfortably clad, well fed, healthy, and cheerful,

11_with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks
with an uncommon array of agreeable and intelligent countenances peering over the tops of the desks. (crickets, dog bark)

12_Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865
Northern journalist John Trowbridge came to Charlestown in the early summer of 1865, a war-worn town with its ruins and seething and

13_six months before Hatter’s school was opened there.
six months before Hatter’s school was opened there. (train sound) Trowbridge arrived at Charlestown in about May, 1865 expecting nothing in particular.

14_He came by train from Harper’s Ferry
(He came by train from Harper’s Ferry a hub of Federal army activity). (women wail)

15_Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there
Old and infirm African-Americans arrived there along with women with children, some “cut loose” by their onetime owners and they sought medical help, food and shelter. (women wail crickets)

16_Able-bodied freedmen were in demand
Able-bodied freedmen were in demand and they were paid well to get the corn and wheat planted). (train)

17_One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown
One morning I took the train up the Valley to Charlestown, distant from Harper’s Ferry of eight miles. The railroad was still in the hands of the government.

18_There were military guards on the platform
There were military guards on the platforms, and about an equal mixture of Loyalists and Rebels within the cars.

19_Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments
Furloughed soldiers, returning to their regiments at Winchester or Staunton, occupied seats with

20_Confederate officers just out of their uniforms
Confederate officers just out of their uniforms. The strong, dark, defiant, self-satisfied face typical of the second-rate “chivalry,” and the good-natured,

21_shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator
shrewd, inquisitive physiognomy of the Yankee speculator going to look at Southern lands,

22_were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast.
were to be seen side by side, in curious contrast. There also rode the well-dressed

23_wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts
wealthy planter, who had been to Washington to solicit pardon for his treasonable acts, and

24_the humble freedman returning to the home
the humble freedman returning to the home from which he had been driven by violence.(train)

25_Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia
Mothers and daughters of the first families of Virginia sat serene and uncomplaining in the atmosphere of mothers and daughters of late their slaves or their neighbors’, but now citizens like themselves, free to go and come, and as dearly entitled to places in the government train as the proudest dames of the land. We passed through a region of country

26_stamped all over by the devastating heel of war
stamped all over by the devastating heel of war. (raven) For miles

27_not a fence or cultivated field was visible
not a fence or cultivated field was visible.

28_It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,
“It is just like this all the way up the Shenandoah Valley,” said a gentleman at my side, a Union man from Winchester.

29_The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest
“The wealthiest people with us are now the poorest." Harper’s Magazine Writer and Illustrator

30_David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote
David Hunter Strother, whose wife came from Charlestown, wrote of just one such landowner who meets in a store a one-time slave of his: (banjo)

31_Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store
Not long ago a country gentleman and one of his old slaves met in a store, where they had gone to transact some business and make purchases. They had parted in 1862, but recognized and greeted each other with the cordiality of ancient friendship, instinctively the while taking stock of each others appearance and deportment. The negro was hale, sleek, and well dressed, and in settling up a smart account which stood against him on the merchants books he showed a porte monnaie plethoric with the results of a summers steady work. The master’s heart was warmed at the evident prosperity of his old servant. (banjo)

32_He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky
He used to think him drunken, lazy, and tricky, and had prophesied his ruin when left to his own devices. Unlike Jonah and most other prophets of evil, he was not embittered at the non-fulfillment of his predictions, but cordially invited Harry out to see the family and the old place. (banjo). The freedman’s observations had not been so satisfactory. The old master was roughly clad in ex-Confederate gray, faded, stained, threadbare, and frayed at the button-holes; his hair and beard grizzled to suit, and his face haggard and care-worn. His pocketbook resembled a dried North Carolina herring. In making his purchases he was scrutinizing and skimpy, and once

33_obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear
obscurely hinted at credit, which the shopkeeper failed to hear. (banjo) That afternoon

34_Harry walked out to the old place
Harry walked out to the old place, and it saddened his heart to see it. The noble woodland that used to be so jealously preserved, (banjo) and was always teeming with possums and coons, had been hacked and haggled until it had nearly disappeared.

35_36_The barn was gone
The barn was gone, and only some charred and blackened stumps indicated where it once stood. The house was paint-less and dilapidated, the enclosures broken, gates off their hinges, or rudely mended with rails or boards; the shade trees worm-eaten and dying at the top, the lawn and borders hirsute with weeds and suckers. (banjo) But still, as of yore, a

37_a hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney
hospitable smoke was pouring out of the kitchen chimney, and the proprietor was ready with a cheerful and friendly welcome.

38_Harry respectfully dropped his hat
Harry respectfully dropped his hat upon the porch floor, while he nervously fumbled for a package in his coat pocket. "I say, Mister Charles, do you still use tabaccy ?" (The negro now carefully abstains from the master and mistress in his address.)

39_Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco
"Oh yes, Harry. And that reminds me here’s a pound of tobacco and a pipe I got for you in town. "Harry looked confounded, and then, shaking with deferential hilarity,

40_excavated a package of like character from his own pocket.
excavated a package of like character from his own pocket. (banjo) Trowbridge continued:

41_I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates.
I suggested that farms, under such circumstances, should be for sale at low rates. "They should be; but

42_your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land.
your Southern aristocrat is a monomaniac on the subject of owning land. He will part with his acres about as willingly as he will part with his life. But everything is being revolutionized now.

43_Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill
Northern men and northern methods are coming into the Valley as sure as water runs down hill. (train)

44_It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world
It is the greatest corn, wheat and grass country in the world. The only objection to it is that

45_in spots the limestone crops out a good deal
in spots the limestone crops out a good deal.” (train) At the end of a long hour’s ride,

46_we arrived at Charles Town
47_interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom
we arrived at Charles Town, chiefly of interest to me as the place of John Brown’s martyrdom. (music)

48_We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields
49_unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves
We alighted from the train on the edge of boundless unfenced fields, into whose melancholy solitudes the desolate streets emptied themselves – rivers to that ocean of weeds. The town resembled to my eye some unprotected female sitting, sorrowful on the wayside,

50_in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen.jpg
in tattered and faded apparel, with unkempt tresses fallen negligently about features which might once have been attractive. (music)

51_On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance.jpg
52_whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.jpg
On the steps of a boarding house I found an acquaintance whose countenance gleamed with pleasure “at sight,” as he said, “of a single loyal face in that nest of secession.”

53_He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried.jpg
He had been two or three days in the place waiting for luggage which had been miscarried. While Jefferson County, West Virginia is still small, the sentiment toward secession throughout the County before the Civil War varied widely, with

54_the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown
the hotbed of secessionist sentiment in the area around Charlestown and adjacent large farms. (mandolin)

55_They are all Rebels here – all rebels!
“They are all Rebels here – all rebels!” he exclaimed as he took his cane and walked with me. “They are a pitiable poverty-stricken set, there is no money in the place, and scarcely anything to eat.

56_We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason
We have for breakfast salt-fish, fried potatoes and treason. Fried potatoes, treason, and salt-fish for dinner. At supper, the fare is slightly varied, and we have treason, salt-fish potatoes, and a little more treason.

57_My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate.jpg
My landlady’ s daughter is Southern fire incarnate; and she illustrates Southern politeness by abusing Northern people and the government from morning ‘till night, for my especial edification. Sometimes I venture to answer her, when she flies at me, figuratively speaking, like a cat. The women are not the only out-spoken Rebels, although they are the worst.

58_The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments
The men don’t hesitate to declare their sentiments, in season and out of season.” (mandolin).
My friend concluded with this figure:

59_The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it
“The war feeling here is like a burning bush with a wet blanket wrapped around it. Looked at from the outside, the fire seems quenched. But just peep under the blanket and there it is, all alive and eating, eating in. The wet blanket is the present government policy; and

60_every act of conciliation shown the Rebels
every act of conciliation shown the Rebels is just letting in so much air to feed the fire.” (mandolin)

61_A short walk up into the center of town.jpg
62_John Browns trial andhanging became symbols to soldiers during the Civil War.jpg
A short walk up into the center of the town took us to the scene of John Brown’s trial. (music, gavel, wagon),

63_John Brown’s body lies a mouldering in the grave.jpg
Oh John Brown’s body lies a moulderin’ in the grave, While weep the sons of bondage whom he ventured all to save; But tho he lost his life while struggling for the slave,

64_his soul is marching on.jpg
His soul is marching on. Glory,

65_Glory Glory hallelujah.jpg
66_John Brown Hanged.jpg
glory, hallelujah (humming, drums)(eerie music) It was a consolation to see that

67_the jail had been laid in ashes.jpg
the jail had been laid in ashes, and that the

68_court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed.jpg
69_a ruin abandoned to rats and toads
court-house, where the mockery of justice was performed, was a ruin abandoned to rats and toads. (toads) Four mossy white brick pillars, still standing, supported a riddled roof, through which God’s blue sky and gracious sunshine smiled.(music) The main portion of the building had been literally torn to pieces.

70_In the floorless hall of justice.jpg
In the floorless hall of justice, rank weeds were growing. Names of Union soldiers were scrawled along the wall. No torch had been applied to the wood-work, but the work of destruction had been

71_performed by hilarious soldier boys.jpg
performed by the hands of (laughter) hilarious soldier-boys ripping up floors and pulling down laths and joists to the tune of “John Brown” – the swelling melody of the song and the accompaniment of crashing partitions, reminding the citizens who thought to have destroyed the old hero, that his soul was marching on. (eerie music,Glory, glory hallelujah). As we were taking comfort, reflecting how unexpectedly at last justice had been done at that court-house, (horse whinny,wagon) the townspeople passed on the sidewalk,

72_“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
73_a fine-looking, spirited class.jpg
“daughters and sons of beauty,” for they were mostly a fine-looking, spirited class; one of whom, at a question which I put to him, stopped quite willingly and talked with us. I have seldom seen a handsome young face, a steadier eye, or more decided pose and aplomb, neither have I ever seen the outward garment of courtesy so plumply filled out with the spirit of arrogance. His brief replies spoken with a pleasant countenance,

74_yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots.jpg
yet with short, sharp downward inflections, and were like pistol shots. Very evidently the death of John Brown, and the war that came swooping down the old man’s path to avenge him, and to accomplish the work wherein he failed, were not pleasing subjects to this young southern blood.

75_and no wonder his coat had an empty sleeve.jpg
And no wonder. His coat had an empty sleeve. The arm which should have been there had been lost fighting against his country. His almost savage answers did not move me; but all the while

76_I looked with compassion at his fine young face
I looked with compassion at his fine young face, and that pendant idle sleeve. (music)

77_He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost
78_all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.jpg
He had fought against his country; his country had won; and he was of those who had lost, not arms and legs only, but all they had been madly fighting for, and more, – prosperity, prestige and power.

79_His beautiful South had been devastated.jpg
80_her soul drenched with the best blood
His beautiful South was devastated, and her soil drenched with the best blood of her young men. Whether regarded as a crime or a virtue, (mandolin) the folly of making war upon the mighty North was now demonstrated, and

81_the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South.jpg
82_May well your thoughts be bitter
the despised Yankees had proved conquerors of the chivalry of the South. “Well may your thoughts be bitter,” my heart said, as I thanked him for his information. (mandolin) To my surprise he seemed mollified, his answers losing their explosive quality and sharp downward inflection. He even seemed inclined to continue the conversation and as we passed we left him on the sidewalk looking after us wistfully, as if the spirit working within him had still no word to say different from any he had yet spoken. What his secret thoughts were, standing there with his dangling sleeve, it would be interesting to know. (mandolin)

83_Walking through the town we came to.jpg
84_Here we engaged a bright young colored girl.jpg
Walking through town we came to other barren and open fields on the further side. Here we engaged a bright young colored girl to guide us to the spot where John Brown’s gallows stood. (music) She led us into the wilderness of weeds waist-high to her as she tramped on, parting them before her with her hands. The country all around us lay utterly desolate without enclosures, and without cultivation. We seemed to be striking out into the rolling prairies of the West, except that these fields of ripening and fading weeds had not the summer freshness of the prairie-grass. A few scattering groves skirted them; and here and there a fenceless road drew its winding, dusty line away over the arid hills.

85_“This is about where it was,” said the girl
“This is about where it was,” said the girl, after searching some time among the tall weeds. (music)

Bryan O’Quinn: A Star Is Reborn; Inside:New Music, New natural haircare endorsment and new attitude; There’s More to life!
african songs
Image by ImagePros
Entertainment businessman, business owner, community organizer, model, songwriter, music producer, father, citizen of the world. Bryan O’Quinn was one of the few underground dance music artists to enjoy negligible mainstream exposure during the late ’80s and early ’90s heyday of hip- hop soul
For his new album, Mr. O’Quinn has drawn inspiration from his own songs that have held special moments and professional milestones through the years, and he has dedicated the album to: love, inspiration and dance.

www.nme.com/nme-video/youtube/id/unWFQygEsJA

The Musicale, Barber Shop, Trenton Falls, New York (1866) – Thomas Hicks (American 1823-1890)
african songs
Image by UGArdener
"In nineteenth-century painting, African Americans are often associated with music and dance. (See Christian Mayr’s Kitchen Ball at White Sulphur Springs, Virginia, also in the Museum’s collection.) In this painting Thomas Hicks depicts an impromptu concert in the barbershop of a summer resort in upstate New York. Occupying a separate building on the hotel grounds, the shop was a male preserve, women by custom keeping a respectful distance. The dignified man frozen in mid-song is the hotel’s barber, William Brister. Among the accompanying musicians is a black fiddler who, like the barber, is rendered with none of the usual racial stereotyping. Even so, it is obvious the black men are not guests but employees of the hotel. It is only their musical talent that justifies their prominence in the picture."

artnc.org/works-of-art/musicale-barber-shop-trenton-falls…

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24/04/2015 Week 14 Group A Match Morocco Atlas Lions vs Russian Boxing Team

Some cool morocco music images:

24/04/2015 Week 14 Group A Match Morocco Atlas Lions vs Russian Boxing Team
morocco music
Image by World Series Boxing

Rabat, Morocco
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Image by YoTuT

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Image from page 154 of “The story of the Jubilee Singers : with their songs” (1880)

Check out these african songs images:

Image from page 154 of “The story of the Jubilee Singers : with their songs” (1880)
african songs
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: storyofjubileesi02mars
Title: The story of the Jubilee Singers : with their songs
Year: 1880 (1880s)
Authors: Marsh, J. B. T
Subjects: Jubilee Singers African American musicians African Americans
Publisher: Boston : Houghton, Osgood and Co.
Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
£=* £—V i t*F^=# hope Ill join the band. O Lord, have mer-cy on me, . J. £ .=3 ^ fc r> i —# *—.—*—. i ^ r—1 h f-#-r-b/ A -&? S 1 *=& f -a?- i S=fc S s i y—tr-—e—fc>—I— O Lord, have mer – cy on me; £ 188 0 Lord, have i J* i u

Text Appearing After Image:
Pi Si d a ^t mm nier-cy on me, And I hope 111 join the band. ^ J* h i_A 9 *=* ¥=£ ^=F 2. Gwine to meet my brother there, Sooner, &c. Cho.—0 Lord, have mercy, &c. 3. Gwine to chatter with the Angels, Sooner, <fcc. Cho.—0 Lord, have mercy, &c. 4. Gwine to meet my massa Jesus, Sooner, &o. Cho.—0 Lord, have mercy, &c. 5. Gwine to walk and talk with Jesus, Sooner, Ac Cho.—0 Lord, have mercy, &o. No. 15. WLfll toie in rtje JPiclti. Unison. i m fcbfc* *= •9- v=*% £ 1. 0 what do you say, seekers, 0 what do you say, I g i v *=* 0— -0 0 0 0- -i seekers ; O what do you say, seekers, A-bout the Gospel war ?

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UNAMID Opens Clinic and Schools in North Darfur
african songs
Image by United Nations Photo
Girls from Kuma Garadayat sing a song during the inauguration of six development projects, known as Quick Impact Projects, implemented by the African Union-UN Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID). These projects focus on the areas of education, sanitation, health, community development, and the empowerment of women. They include a clinic, a women’s’ centre and several schools.

UN Photo/Albert González Farran
01 August 2012
Kuma Garadayat, Sudan
Photo # 522404

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