Category Music

Nice African Songs photos

A few nice african songs images I found:

Groot-rooibandsuikerbekkie (1)
african songs
Image by Pixlab.co.za
Alternative Names:
English (Rob 6): Greater Doublecollared Sunbird
English (Rob 7): Greater Double-collared Sunbird
Scientific: Nectarinia afra
German: Großer Halsband-Nektarvogel
French: Souimanga à plastron rouge
Indigenous: iNcuncu(Z),iNcwincwi(Z),Ingcungcu(X),Ntsotsotso(Ts),Rithweethwee(Ts),Xidyamhangani(Ts),
Scientific Explained:
afra: Latin, African.
Measurements: Length 14-15 cm; wing (286 male) 59-65,7-72, (101 female) 54,3-59,6-65,5; tail (236 male) 48-55,2-65, (78 female) 42-47,4-55,5; tarsus (213 male) 14-16,6-19,5, (78 female) 14-15,6-17; culmen (227 male) 19,6-29,4-33, (71 female) 23,6-27-29,5; red breastband (200 male) 14-20,9-29,5. Weight (10 male) 11-12,2-13,3 g, (6 female) 8,1-9,8-11,3 g.
Bare Parts: Iris dark brown; bill, legs and feet black.
Identification: Size medium; similar to Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird, but larger, longer-billed and with broader red breastband. Male: Head, throat and back brilliant metallic green; rump blue; breastband bright red, about 20 mm wide (only about 8-10 mm wide in Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird), bordered above by narrow metallic blue band; belly smoky grey. Female: Above brownish grey; below light yellowish grey; separable from female Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird only by much longer bill and larger size. Immature: Similar to adult female.
Voice: Most common callnote by both sexes is high-pitched persistent tseeee, falling in tone; song sustained jumble of tweeting, twittering and chipping notes, louder and richer than song of Lesser Doublecollared Sunbird, usually starting with husky zhyeet or zheet-eet; characteristic harsh sskert callnote; excited ch ch ch cher-rreee by male when chasing female; stuttering hissing ss ss ss alarm notes.
Distribution: From sw Cape to n Transvaal; not Lesotho.
Status: Common resident; vagrant to Transvaal bushveld and lowveld.
Habitat: Coastal and riverine bush, forest edge, montane scrub, Protea savanna, parks, gardens.
Habits: Usually solitary or in pairs; gathers in loose groups of 6-7 birds at good food source, sometimes in company with other bird species, including other sunbirds. Male often sings from exposed perch, but also from inside bush; both sexes often chase conspecifics and other sunbirds. Hovers in front of webs to extract spiders.
Food: Nectar (e.g. Erythrina, Schotia, Protea, Erica, Salvia, Plumbago and many exotic garden flowers), insects, spiders.
Breeding: Season: All months (peak October-November) in e Cape, June to January in KwaZulu-Natal, June, July and October in Transvaal; probably most months throughout S Africa; up to 3 broods/season. Nest: Oval of grass, Usnea lichen, rootlets, bark, wool, cotton, fur, plant down, twigs, rags, dried fruits, leaf mould, etc., bound with spider web; lined with hundreds of feathers; side-top entrance always with porch; external height 13-15 cm; entrance diameter 3-4 cm; built by female only in 10-24 days. Clutch: (20) 1-1,8-2 eggs (usually 2). Eggs: White, greenish white to pale grey, spotted, mottled, clouded and scrawled with brown, olive and grey; measure (24) 18,6 x 12,4 (17-20,4 x 11,8-13,1). Incubation: 15-16 days by female only. Nestling: Unrecorded; fed by both parents.

Paddle steamer in New Orleans
african songs
Image by denisbin
Riverboat in New Orleans.

Some geography of New Orleans. The location and geography of New Orleans is unique in America. Most of the city is well below sea level, except for the French Quarter which was built on a natural levee of the river in the 1700s. As the city has expanded special levees, pumps and flood gates have been erected around the city. When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 the storm itself did damage to New Orleans but the major devastation came from the levees failing and water flooding at least 80% of the city area. It is useful to remember that 50% of New Orleans city is water and not land! Its location on the banks of the mighty Mississippi River, near the delta bayous and swamps was the raison d’être for the city. It was to control all navigation and commercial activity on the river and to provide a safe harbour as close as possible to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its strategic location it has always been the prize for invaders during wars. The city has a tropical climate and the regions north of the city along the banks of the Mississippi were and are major sugar plantation areas, not cotton plantation areas. You have to travel upstate in Louisiana to find the cotton growing areas. This tropical climate along one of the world’s major water courses meant until recently that the area was plagued with Yellow Fever, malaria and other deadly illnesses. To the north and east of the city is Lake Pontchartrain, a huge body of water; in fact the city is bordered by water on three sides. By road the mouth of the Mississippi is over 100 miles away but this is because the river follows a circuitous route to the mouth of its delta. The city metropolitan area has a population of 1.1 million, exactly the same as the population of Adelaide. Although the population fell after Hurricane Katrina the population is now 90% of what is was before the hurricane. There is little evidence of flood damage in the areas that we will see as tourists. The French Quarter was not flooded because the founding French settlers sensibly chose a high site for their city.

Some early history of New Orleans. The city was founded in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, a major trader in furs bought from the Indians up river. They got the local Indians, the Chitimacha to cede land to them. The Company named the city after the Duke of Orleans who was the Regent of France at that time. After the French Wars between the Indians, British, French and Spanish in America from 1756-63 the French ceded New Orleans to the Spanish. The Spanish held New Orleans from 1763 to 1801 when Napoleon defeated the Spanish and New Orleans and its territories to the west were returned to France. As Napoleon needed more funds to continue his Napoleonic Wars with Britain and others he soon (in 1803) sold New Orleans and all territories west of the Mississippi to President Jefferson for the small sum of million. West Florida, New Orleans and the west comprised over 800,000 square miles! The Louisiana Purchase covered – Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nth & Sth Dakota, Oklahoma & parts of Texas and Wyoming.

When the French settled New Orleans they built a trading port city of wooden buildings on the high ground along the banks of the Mississippi. The streets were named after the royal houses of France and Catholic saints, hence Bourbon Street after the Dukes of Bourbon, not the whisky. Local pine was the timber used for building the houses, often on brick pylons to raise the houses above any possible flood threat. The compact town was destroyed by two major fires during the Spanish ownership of Louisiana in 1788 and again in 1794. The city was rebuilt in brick, with wrought iron balconies in the Spanish style usually with central courtyards. So most of what we see today in the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is actually of Spanish design and from the era of Spanish building in the late 1790s. So the French Quarter is really the Spanish Quarter and the Spanish buildings include the three major public buildings of this era- the Cathedral of St. Louis, and the adjoining Cabildo and Presbytere. The first St. Louis Cathedral was built in 1781; the second in 1725; and the third in 1789. That third structure in Spanish style was almost totally rebuilt in 1850 in the style of the previous cathedral.

The Strategic Importance of New Orleans. Not long after the Americans bought New Orleans a major war broke out between England and her former American colonies. War raged from 1812-14 when the British, amongst other achievements, sailed up the Potomac River in Washington and burnt down the White House and attacked the national capital. As the port that controlled the Mississippi and the river system that went up to the British colonies in Canada the British wanted to retake New Orleans. A young American officer, Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson) led the American forces in a battle with the British. The battle of New Orleans (remember the hit song about it in 1959?) took place in January 1815. It was the final battle of the War of 1812 and despite bad odds Andrew Jackson and the Americans prevailed and won the battle. Hence the main square in New Orleans is Jackson Square with a fine statue of the later President on horseback is in the centre of the square. And again during the Civil War both the Confederates and Unionists wanted to control New Orleans. During the Antebellum period New Orleans had been a major port for the slave trade and the major slave auction centre of the American South. Louisiana declared their secession from the Union in January 1861 and the Confederates bolstered their occupation of the area. It was the link to the South’s cotton plantations up the Mississippi River Valley and its link across the Mississippi to the wealthy states of Texas, Arkansas and some secessionist counties of Missouri. The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861. New Orleans was blockaded by the North in May 1861 showing what an important prize the city was to the Union. After two short battles in April 1862 the Union forces occupied New Orleans and split the Confederacy into two parts as it then controlled the Mississippi River too.

The Creole Culture of New Orleans. Creole culture in Louisiana is still strong. Creoles are primarily the people descended from the early French and Spanish settlers mixed with later German immigrants and African slaves. Creoles were originally white Europeans but the term later included mixed race people. When the Haitian Revolution led by slaves erupted in 1804 many French residents fled from Haiti to New Orleans with their African slaves. They reinforced the French culture of New Orleans and established their three tiered society of white Creoles, mixed race Creoles and black slaves. The mixed race Creoles were mainly fee black people and added to the free black population of New Orleans. French speakers dominated in New Orleans until 1830. But as late as 1900, 25% of residents spoke French and 75% could understand it. (250,000 Louisianans still speak French at home today.) Half the schools in New Orleans taught in French until the Civil War. In 1862 the Union occupier of the city General Butler abolished French instruction and enforced English teaching. The War made New Orleans an American city. But the Creoles did not disappear. They continued to dominate society for some time. The Creole planters along the Mississippi lived on their plantations during the hot malaria filled summers but moved to their French Quarter town houses for the cool winters. (It was the reverse in Charleston where the planters lived in Charleston in the hot summers and spent winters on their plantations.) The New Orleans winter was the time for balls and parties and the celebrations around Lent and the Mardi Gras activities, which still persist as a reminder of the French heritage of the city. The white French Creoles also often took black slave women as mistresses but unlike the white Americans they tended to give freedom to the children born from these unions. Thus New Orleans ended up with the largest number of free blacks of any Southern city in the Antebellum days. Mixed race Creoles had their own society balls and functions. Many had property and were quite wealthy in their own rights because of grants from their white Creole fathers. But their access to political and legal rights disappeared during the Jim Crow era as white Americans applied their white-black caste system on all parts of America including Louisiana. Free persons of colour were discriminated against by the Jim Crow regulations and segregation in New Orleans too. Change came with of the Civil Rights era.

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Cool African Songs images

Some cool african songs images:

Horse Hitching posts in the Garden District . Tie up your horse here.
african songs
Image by denisbin
Horse hitching posts in the Garden dIstrict of New Orleans.

Some geography of New Orleans. The location and geography of New Orleans is unique in America. Most of the city is well below sea level, except for the French Quarter which was built on a natural levee of the river in the 1700s. As the city has expanded special levees, pumps and flood gates have been erected around the city. When Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005 the storm itself did damage to New Orleans but the major devastation came from the levees failing and water flooding at least 80% of the city area. It is useful to remember that 50% of New Orleans city is water and not land! Its location on the banks of the mighty Mississippi River, near the delta bayous and swamps was the raison d’être for the city. It was to control all navigation and commercial activity on the river and to provide a safe harbour as close as possible to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its strategic location it has always been the prize for invaders during wars. The city has a tropical climate and the regions north of the city along the banks of the Mississippi were and are major sugar plantation areas, not cotton plantation areas. You have to travel upstate in Louisiana to find the cotton growing areas. This tropical climate along one of the world’s major water courses meant until recently that the area was plagued with Yellow Fever, malaria and other deadly illnesses. To the north and east of the city is Lake Pontchartrain, a huge body of water; in fact the city is bordered by water on three sides. By road the mouth of the Mississippi is over 100 miles away but this is because the river follows a circuitous route to the mouth of its delta. The city metropolitan area has a population of 1.1 million, exactly the same as the population of Adelaide. Although the population fell after Hurricane Katrina the population is now 90% of what is was before the hurricane. There is little evidence of flood damage in the areas that we will see as tourists. The French Quarter was not flooded because the founding French settlers sensibly chose a high site for their city.

Some early history of New Orleans. The city was founded in 1718 by the French Mississippi Company, a major trader in furs bought from the Indians up river. They got the local Indians, the Chitimacha to cede land to them. The Company named the city after the Duke of Orleans who was the Regent of France at that time. After the French Wars between the Indians, British, French and Spanish in America from 1756-63 the French ceded New Orleans to the Spanish. The Spanish held New Orleans from 1763 to 1801 when Napoleon defeated the Spanish and New Orleans and its territories to the west were returned to France. As Napoleon needed more funds to continue his Napoleonic Wars with Britain and others he soon (in 1803) sold New Orleans and all territories west of the Mississippi to President Jefferson for the small sum of million. West Florida, New Orleans and the west comprised over 800,000 square miles! The Louisiana Purchase covered – Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nth & Sth Dakota, Oklahoma & parts of Texas and Wyoming.

When the French settled New Orleans they built a trading port city of wooden buildings on the high ground along the banks of the Mississippi. The streets were named after the royal houses of France and Catholic saints, hence Bourbon Street after the Dukes of Bourbon, not the whisky. Local pine was the timber used for building the houses, often on brick pylons to raise the houses above any possible flood threat. The compact town was destroyed by two major fires during the Spanish ownership of Louisiana in 1788 and again in 1794. The city was rebuilt in brick, with wrought iron balconies in the Spanish style usually with central courtyards. So most of what we see today in the French Quarter or Vieux Carré is actually of Spanish design and from the era of Spanish building in the late 1790s. So the French Quarter is really the Spanish Quarter and the Spanish buildings include the three major public buildings of this era- the Cathedral of St. Louis, and the adjoining Cabildo and Presbytere. The first St. Louis Cathedral was built in 1781; the second in 1725; and the third in 1789. That third structure in Spanish style was almost totally rebuilt in 1850 in the style of the previous cathedral.

The Strategic Importance of New Orleans. Not long after the Americans bought New Orleans a major war broke out between England and her former American colonies. War raged from 1812-14 when the British, amongst other achievements, sailed up the Potomac River in Washington and burnt down the White House and attacked the national capital. As the port that controlled the Mississippi and the river system that went up to the British colonies in Canada the British wanted to retake New Orleans. A young American officer, Andrew Jackson (later President Andrew Jackson) led the American forces in a battle with the British. The battle of New Orleans (remember the hit song about it in 1959?) took place in January 1815. It was the final battle of the War of 1812 and despite bad odds Andrew Jackson and the Americans prevailed and won the battle. Hence the main square in New Orleans is Jackson Square with a fine statue of the later President on horseback is in the centre of the square. And again during the Civil War both the Confederates and Unionists wanted to control New Orleans. During the Antebellum period New Orleans had been a major port for the slave trade and the major slave auction centre of the American South. Louisiana declared their secession from the Union in January 1861 and the Confederates bolstered their occupation of the area. It was the link to the South’s cotton plantations up the Mississippi River Valley and its link across the Mississippi to the wealthy states of Texas, Arkansas and some secessionist counties of Missouri. The first shots were fired at Fort Sumter in April 1861. New Orleans was blockaded by the North in May 1861 showing what an important prize the city was to the Union. After two short battles in April 1862 the Union forces occupied New Orleans and split the Confederacy into two parts as it then controlled the Mississippi River too.

The Creole Culture of New Orleans. Creole culture in Louisiana is still strong. Creoles are primarily the people descended from the early French and Spanish settlers mixed with later German immigrants and African slaves. Creoles were originally white Europeans but the term later included mixed race people. When the Haitian Revolution led by slaves erupted in 1804 many French residents fled from Haiti to New Orleans with their African slaves. They reinforced the French culture of New Orleans and established their three tiered society of white Creoles, mixed race Creoles and black slaves. The mixed race Creoles were mainly fee black people and added to the free black population of New Orleans. French speakers dominated in New Orleans until 1830. But as late as 1900, 25% of residents spoke French and 75% could understand it. (250,000 Louisianans still speak French at home today.) Half the schools in New Orleans taught in French until the Civil War. In 1862 the Union occupier of the city General Butler abolished French instruction and enforced English teaching. The War made New Orleans an American city. But the Creoles did not disappear. They continued to dominate society for some time. The Creole planters along the Mississippi lived on their plantations during the hot malaria filled summers but moved to their French Quarter town houses for the cool winters. (It was the reverse in Charleston where the planters lived in Charleston in the hot summers and spent winters on their plantations.) The New Orleans winter was the time for balls and parties and the celebrations around Lent and the Mardi Gras activities, which still persist as a reminder of the French heritage of the city. The white French Creoles also often took black slave women as mistresses but unlike the white Americans they tended to give freedom to the children born from these unions. Thus New Orleans ended up with the largest number of free blacks of any Southern city in the Antebellum days. Mixed race Creoles had their own society balls and functions. Many had property and were quite wealthy in their own rights because of grants from their white Creole fathers. But their access to political and legal rights disappeared during the Jim Crow era as white Americans applied their white-black caste system on all parts of America including Louisiana. Free persons of colour were discriminated against by the Jim Crow regulations and segregation in New Orleans too. Change came with of the Civil Rights era.

Image taken from page 399 of ‘Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates’
african songs
Image by The British Library
Image taken from:

Title: "Under the African Sun: a description of native races in Uganda, sporting adventures, and other experiences … With 134 illustrations from photographs by the author and two coloured plates"
Author: ANSORGE, William John.
Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 10094.f.7."
Page: 399
Place of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1899
Publisher: William Heinemann
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 000092900

Explore:
Find this item in the British Library catalogue, ‘Explore’.
Open the page in the British Library’s itemViewer (page image 399)
Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 399 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

Order a higher quality version from here.

Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony – CSM Bronson – United States Army Africa – 090807
african songs
Image by US Army Africa
www.usaraf.army.mil

United States Army Africa
Assumption of Responsibility Ceremony

Command Sergeant Major Gary J. Bronson
7 August 2009

Hoekstra Field, Caserma Ederle, Vicenza, Italy

Cleared for public release. The images are generally considered in the public domain. Request that credit be given to the U.S. Army and individual photographer.

To learn more about U.S. Army Africa visit our official website at www.usaraf.army.mil

Official Twitter Feed: www.twitter.com/usarmyafrica

Official YouTube video channel: www.youtube.com/usarmyafrica

U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson, U.S. Army Africa, PAO

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Festival Gnaoua et Musiques du Monde 2011

Check out these morocco music images:

Festival Gnaoua et Musiques du Monde 2011
morocco music
Image by herr_S
Essaouira-Marokko

Armin Van Buuren concert with Jochen Miller @ Abu Dhabi – 30/06/2011 – 01/07/2011
morocco music
Image by karimjazouani
Armin Van Buuren concert with Jochen Miller @ Abu Dhabi – 30/06/2011 – 01/07/2011

DCIM0SPORT
morocco music
Image by connie5001
Dcim0sport

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Lastest African Songs News

Universal Responsibility in a Matrixed Economic World
african songs
Image by Wonderlane
Written in 2006

I am concerned that Obama and his staff are not aware enough of the danger and that his planned policies do not go far enough.

Reading up on America’s depression era New Deal of the 1930’s and the times leading up to it are remarkably like the times we are going though, except no one bailed out the fat cats then (as you know). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal

Agreed bailing out the rich will help prevent some suicides like Adolf Merckle, the German billionaire who slipped from #44 most wealthy person on the planet to number #77 or Thierry Magon de La Villehuchet, a fund manager who invested with Bernie Madoff and apparently committed suicide at his office – to me these people’s death are no laughing matter – not any different than those overleveraged investors who committed suicide on Black Thursday in 1929 or thereabouts by jumping from the buildings they were in. And what is it that Merckle could see that was so scary?

Some people actually laughed in 1929 to see or hear of the suicides, as if those folks deserved it or were somehow different than they were – a few months later, out of a job — they stopped laughing.

My feeling is that we may be lucky by the end of Obama’s first term in office to see any real strides. The only capital that he can really bank on is who he IS, and that the govt at least is out of the hands of incompetents (from our standpoint) and warmongering profiteers. Ugh! the sick thing is industrial war complex oldsters really don’t get that the world has changed – we ARE in this together just as HH the Dalai Lamas and HH the Popes have long preached. We communicate on an entirely different level, more frequently and around the world. Arguably there is universal responsibility and we are just getting a clue.

"The Google" Bush said! Hissss! Boo! speaking of getting a clue.

For just one example every night that I post a new image on Flickr – I know, no, no, I expect people from around the world will comment on it by the next morning – in one day – all around the world. And the comments in foreign languages I will translate to read and my reply I will translate and respond with – nearly instantly in their language. Even my requests are posted by Flickr in the native language of the person I am requesting their photo from – all with a drop down menu – no effort on my part.

Another example is that of the late Oscar Grant, an unarmed African-American man shot in the back and killed in Oakland by the police (by accident or purposely) is instantly seen over the Web from every recording cell phone present – police authorities – placed in their roles to "serve and protect" absolutely can not hide any more behind some story when everyone anywhere can see what occured. Happy, satisfied people don’t protest.

Franklin Roosevelt tried a lot of things to stabilize the economy. The stuff he did that was dismantled appears to be the root cause of the suffering in the country now, as the rich continue to amass profits while the lower classes lose a place to live. Political leaders, can’t hide any more either and the results of their efforts for good or bad will be known sooner and in more detail than ever before.

There is also an issue more complex than it first appears, of the average age of baby boomers, as they retire and there are not enough educated people coming into the working social system who can earn enough because education was gutted — either to make sure that there was no opposition to the will of the wealthy greedy or because self-serving politicos were also too short sighted to see what the results of not funding education would be.

Not everyone is like us, not everyone takes joy in educating themselves, and some education, like primary research is beyond the costs of a single individual to bear, or one person to complete.

Poorer middle-classed housing such as San Francisco’s Daly City has inexplicably one of the highest forced foreclosure rates in the country. Economists are researching why but *hey* that is way, way past a dollar short and a day late.

When I asked a religious leader about the causes of being out of work he said "stabilize your mind" and I think that to a large extent – that is the basic root cause of the US current troubles. The fears we have are based on tainted emotions. "The only fear we have is fear itself" another realization by US President Franklin D. Roosevelt that sounds like a call to arms once again with deeper meaning.

We really have to get rid of tainted emotions such as greed and the desire by even those with education and money to willingly inflict pain and suffering on others – such as by torture or slavery – where we can not root it out of ourselves we need to legislate it and make it clear that it is a common goal, a community of the world standard to commit to rid ourselves of afflictive emotions; we need to root out fear itself, greed, and ignorance.

We can’t stand aside and look any more; stabilizing our own minds, taking universal individual responsibility – that is where the future is really at; only then we will have something we can rely on, ourselves as well as each other.

"We’ll forward in this generation
Triumphantly …
Emancipate yourself from mental slavery
None but ourselves can free our minds"

Redemption Song
-Bob Marley

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Baloji

Check out these music images:

Baloji
music
Image by Gertrud K.
7. April 2017 bei Free! Music im Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin

Alchimist der Klänge: In Balojis Sound fließen kongolesische Rumba Lingala und Clubbeats, französischsprachiger Rap und Konsumkritik zusammen. Seine ebenso poetischen wie kämpferischen Texte thematisieren aktuelle Politik im Kongo, den Stellenwert von Telekommunikationsunternehmen oder was es bedeutet, wenn Bier billiger als Gemüse ist. Live begleitet vom Orchestre de la Katuba um Dizzy Mandjeku, dem legendären Gitarristen von Franco & TPOK Jazz, wird daraus sehr heutige Tanzmusik – uplifting und politisch.

Fender Guitar 13
music
Image by Larry Ziffle

Gibson Guitars 30
music
Image by Larry Ziffle

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Cool African Songs images

Check out these african songs images:

John Wesley Work Home at Fisk University
african songs
Image by SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent)
According to the historic marker:
In 1937, this Victorian-style house became the home of John W. Work III. A teacher and composer for 39 years, he served his alma mater by enriching the Fisk musical traditions. Director of the Jubilee Singers, Work III, a serious composer, completed more than 100 compositions. He was not only an acclaimed composer and choral conductor, but also a recognized author, educator and ethnomusicologist.

His father, John W. Work II, composer of the Fisk alma mater, "The Gold and Blue," was known as rescuer and preservationist of Negro religious music. Work II’s book, Folk Songs of the American Negro, was one of the first extensive studies on the origin and development of religious African-American music be a descendant of an ex-slave who lived during the time many of the songs has their beginnings.

Senegal Fast Food
african songs
Image by 10b travelling
Every time I drove past a restaurant with this offer I thought of Amadou & Mariam’s song "Senegal Fast Food"

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones “The Black Patti”
african songs
Image by roberthuffstutter
THIS IS NOT MY ART–THIS IS PUBLISHED FROM WIKIPEDIA FOR INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from The Black Patti)
"Black Patti" redirects here. For the record label, see Black Patti Records.
Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones

Background information
Birth nameMatilda Sissieretta Joyner
Also known asThe Black Patti
BornJanuary 5, 1868
Portsmouth, Virginia, U.S.
DiedJune 24, 1933 (aged 65)
Providence, Rhode Island
Genresgrand opera, light opera, popular music
Years active1887–1915

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, known as Sissieretta Jones, (January 5, 1868 or 1869[1] – June 24, 1933[2]) was an African-American soprano. She sometimes was called "The Black Patti" in reference to Italian opera singer Adelina Patti. Jones’ repertoire included grand opera, light opera, and popular music.[3]

Matilda Sissieretta Joyner was born in Portsmouth, Virginia, United States, to Jeremiah Malachi Joyner, an African Methodist Episcopal minister, and Henrietta Beale.[2] By 1876 her family moved to Providence, Rhode Island,[4] where she began singing at an early age in her father’s Pond Street Baptist Church.[2]
In 1883, Joyner began the formal study of music at the Providence Academy of Music. The same year she married David Richard Jones, a news dealer and hotel bellman. In the late 1880s, Jones was accepted at the New England Conservatory of Music.[1] In 1887, she performed at Boston’s Music Hall before an audience of 5,000.[2]

Jones made her New York debut on April 5, 1888, at Steinway Hall.[1] During a performance at Wallack’s Theater in New York, Jones came to the attention of Adelina Patti’s manager, who recommended that Jones tour the West Indies with the Fisk Jubilee Singers.[2] Jones made successful tours of the Caribbean in 1888 and 1892.[1]

In February 1892, Jones performed at the White House for President Benjamin Harrison.[2] She eventually sang for four consecutive presidents — Harrison, Grover Cleveland, William McKinley, and Theodore Roosevelt — and the British royal family.[1][2][3]

Jones in an 1889 poster[5]
Jones performed at the Grand Negro Jubilee at New York’s Madison Square Garden in April 1892 before an audience of 75,000. She sang the song "Swanee River" and selections from La traviata.[3] She was so popular that she was invited to perform at the Pittsburgh Exposition (1892) and the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago (1893).[4]
In June 1892, Jones became the first African-American to sing at the Music Hall in New York (renamed Carnegie Hall the following year).[1][6] Among the selections in her program were Charles Gounod’s "Ave Maria" and Giuseppe Verdi’s "Sempre libera" (from La traviata).[1] The New York Echo wrote of her performance at the Music Hall: "If Mme Jones is not the equal of Adelina Patti, she at least can come nearer it than anything the American public has heard. Her notes are as clear as a mockingbird’s and her annunciation perfect."[1]
In 1893, Jones met composer Antonín Dvo?ák, and in January 1894 she performed parts of his Symphony No. 9 at Madison Square Garden. Dvo?ák wrote a solo part for Jones.[1]
Jones met with international success. Besides the United States and the West Indies, Jones toured in South America, Australia, India, and southern Africa.[1] During a European tour in 1895 and 1896, Jones performed in London, Paris, Berlin, Cologne, Munich, Milan, and Saint Petersburg.[7]

1898 newspaper advertisement for the Black Patti Troubadours

In 1896, Jones returned to Providence to care for her mother, who had become ill.[1] Jones found that access to most American classical concert halls was limited by racism. She formed the Black Patti Troubadours (later renamed the Black Patti Musical Comedy Company), a musical and acrobatic act made up of 40 jugglers, comedians, dancers and a chorus of 40 trained singers.[2]
The revue paired Jones with rising vaudeville composers Bob Cole and Billy Johnson. The show consisted of a musical skit, followed by a series of short songs and acrobatic performances. During the final third of each show, Jones performed arias and operatic excerpts.[7] The revue provided Jones with a comfortable income, reportedly in excess of ,000 per year. Several members of the troupe, such as Bert Williams, went on to become famous.[1]

Jones retired from performing in 1915. She devoted the remainder of her life to her church and to caring for her mother. Jones was forced to sell most of her property to survive.[1][2] She died penniless on June 24, 1933.[2]

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Nice African Songs photos

Some cool african songs images:

RIver of soul – Marcomé – New World Music
african songs
Image by Marcome : Ambient New Age Music
River of Soul is the second New World music album by Marcomé.
This pivotal sophomore release successfully fuses the dreaminess of New Age music, the sultriness of World and boasts an exotic palette of Latin sounds, Middle-Eastern instrumentation, jazz and African rhythms.

get your free songs at www.Marcome.com

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Nokia 5800 Xpress Music

Nokia 5800 Sim Free

As a true member of the Xpress Music series, the Nokia Xpress 5800 aims for the music lovers. It is one of the first Nokia devices that supports the innovative â??Comes with Musicâ?? service, which allows users to have a full access to music downloads for a year. The device features all those characteristics that will allow the users to enjoy their favourite music on the go.

The 5800 comes with a vast in built memory of 8GB expandable up to 16GB, great sound quality and easy access to all the main features. Nokia 5800 will enable the users to store more than 6000 music files, listen to them using the 3.5 jack and ensure superb quality with equalizer and audio surround.

Following the example of its competitors Nokia allows its users to access the Nokia Music Store, downloading albums, singles or simple mp3 files for their phone. Using the new software, Nokia Music PC for the personal computers, the users can achieve the perfect synchronization of their PC and mobile phone with a simple drag and drop.

The New Nokia 5800 Xpress Music is a device that boasts a resistive touch screen, with a selection of input methods. Users can choose from finger touch, stylus or plectrum, while there are some amazing features on, such as a handwriting recognition and mini QWERTY keyboard.

Thanks to the quite small size, the Nokia 5800 Xpress Music reminds us more of a candy bar phone than a typical rectangle smart phone. It comes at 111 x 51.7 x 15.5 mm and 102gr. The main advantage of this shape and size is that it gives people the chance to use it with one hand; this is actually very practical for those who want to enjoy its amazing features on the go. Combined with the hand shake control the 5800 seems a really practical and flexible device.

The Nokia 5800 XpressMusic boasts a 3.2 megapixel camera with an amazing Carl Zeiss lens; users can share their images and videos with friends online in Facebook or FlickR.  They also have the chance to share their favourite music using the in built Bluetooth, the online sharing abilities and of course the regular MMS application. 

Nokia promised music for the masses and it seems that it managed to do so, introducing the 5800 Sim Free XpressMusic. Sleek design, flexibility and a vast array of specifications in Sim Free mode, with no contract limitations and restrictions: What more can a modern user ask from a mobile phone?

I live and work in the South East of England I am married with 4 children. I am the publisher of several websites my latest being Sim Card & mobile phones

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Podcast Safe Music

Podcasting is the new thing in broadcasting nowadays. Practically anyone can create his own podcast and make himself known to the world. Perhaps the best thing about podcasting is that it is meant to be free. In addition to that, podcasts transcend the boundaries of traditional broadcasting. You may be from the US but anyone with access to the internet can listen to your podcast. A person may be in Timbuktu and yet have access to your podcast.


Music is inherent to the success of any podcast. It adds spice and flavor to an otherwise bland broadcast. That is why a large pool of resources has been developed by people in the podcasting community. Beginners and veterans a like search for the perfect background music or filler sounds for every podcast they make. So how do you go about looking for that spice?


Despite the freedom provided by podcasting, there are some issues you must address before jumping into the bandwagon and creating your own podcast. Copyright and intellectual property rights have been a main concern in all aspects of broadcasting for some time now and podcasting is not exempt from that. As a result, the term podsafe has come into existence. What exactly is podsafe? This term encompasses any material that may be used for podcasts without violating any copyright or license. A special thing about podsafe material is that the very same material might require some sort of license in other media but totally safe for podcasting. Due to the open community nature of podcasting, many songs, music, and other type of materials are allowed to be used for free exclusively for podcasts. While you might have to acquire the permission of the copyright holder for other broadcasting media, with podsafe material, you can use it freely in podcasts.


Some specific kinds of work are inherently podsafe. Works that fall under the public domain or some works with Creative Commons licenses can be used in podcasts without any issues. They are meant to be used, and used freely.


There are some entities on the web that license music especially for podcasts. Their podcast safe music is generally available to anyone for downloading and for use in free broadcasts over the internet. The only restriction they have is for the user to duly acknowledge the source. Anyone may also post music on their sites as long as the piece of work is totally original.


Some sites make their music available for no fee at all. On the other hand there are sites which promote artists â?? particularly independent ones â?? and charge a small fee for downloading their songs. Notably, these sites also offer labeled artists and are supposed to split the downloading fees with them.


The important thing to bear in mind when looking for podcast safe music is that most of the groups offering materials make them available to the general public for free. The caveat is that your podcast must not be used for commercial purposes. If that is the case, then you will have no problems finding the right track for your podcast.

Podcastblaster.com supplies a complete podcasting solution including podcast safe music and tips on creating podcasts.

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