Category Music

Ready to go when sending a parcel to Morocco

Morocco is a country in the North of Africa and is steeped in history and culture. The history of the country spans over 12 centuries so a trip here will offer you plenty to do. With a growing population that currently stands at just over 35 million, there are plenty of opportunities for people to experience and you can be sure of a warm welcome. The growing population, coupled with a healthy economy means businesses have looked upon Morocco as a potential expansion plan.

The Moroccan economy has, since the early nineties, being stabilised and is considered a very liberal economy. This is because many industries that were previously government controlled have since been privatised and as such the economy now runs off a supply and demand. This is great news for UK businesses that may be thinking of moving into the country as it shows they are encouraging foreign investment. Despite this, any move into the Moroccan industry must be researched carefully and the logistics of a move here have to be considered.

When we talk about logistical areas we mean, making sure that anything that has to be sent from the UK to Morocco and vice versa can be done in the most efficient and cost effective way possible. Cost effective may be the most important thing here because in the past, sending a parcel or package to Morocco was not the easiest thing to do and could take weeks for the package to arrive but with the online couriers that are now available, you can sort out the whole delivery online with minimal fuss and you can have your parcel picked up from a home or work address, making it easier for you.

There may be a few people you know who have recently moved out there and there are plenty of reasons why they would. The country is steeped in history and culture; the cuisine for one is considered to be one of the most diverse in the world and is enjoyed by many people all over the world as it is like no other cuisine in the world with a variety of tastes and spices making it unique. Literature and music are also popular pastimes in Morocco and can be enjoyed by all visitors there.

Morocco parcel delivery is going to grow in popularity with a thriving economy and a great culture so if you are looking for the leading international delivery options make sure you search online.

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Due Diligence – Experiences of a Western Woman Researching Property in Morocco

morocco music
by herr_S

As part of any due diligence process, a visit in person is recommended. This helps get a feel for the country and place in question. Understanding a country’s culture, lifestyle and the people helps establish whether a property purchase is appropriate for an individual. In this case it was Saidia, Morocco.

So the first cultural difference is the manner of driving in Morocco. It is very different from driving in Europe. It is either the way in Morocco, or development has come at such a fast pace for Moroccans, they almost don’t seem to notice when they wander into the road and are completely unperturbed by the presence of moving cars. Drivers seem to choose which lane to travel in, rather than adhere to any kind of accepted code of motoring conduct. This is something holiday-makers will need to get used to.

Currently most of the decent hotels are an hour away in Oujda (until the opening of the upmarket hotels on the Saidia site this summer). Oujda is a typical Moroccan town. Being in more traditional surroundings provides the chance to glimpse the real Morocco, the surrounding area of Saidia and the facilities potential property buyers could expect. It also gave a great insight into the ease of transportation and getting around.

The second cultural difference is how the men and women live. In Oujda if a woman wants to relax with a mint tea, so much a part of daily Morocco, then this is done at home. Cafes are mainly full of men, with not a woman in sight. Evidently there are some boundaries that differ between continental European norms and a Muslim nation.

The antithesis to this was Saidia, which in contrast has quite a cosmopolitan feel. Local women and foreigners happily mingle in the restaurants and cafes, without any of the staring that can be found in the more traditional towns.

The sheer scale of what is being created in Saidia creates a significant impression. Lots of beach side properties have been built, next to golden, sandy Mediterranean beaches. The Moroccan beaches are the mirror image of Spain’s but without all the same level of development. It certainly has a magnetic pull. This is where visiting in person brings a property to life. There are few developments in Europe on this scale and size. Seeing is believing.

It is always reassuring to prospective buyers to see a development under way. It is at this point that website details and specifications, direct from the developers, can be checked out fully. Although it did seem that pockets of work were focused around the hotels and one or two residential blocks. There had been some delay owing to a number of reasons e.g. weather and the relevant licences taking longer to come through.

It is not only good to see progress to date, but also to gauge how quickly things are moving on and the likely completion dates. Getting first hand experience of a developer, how they approach a visit and the answers they provide to questions, acts as a proxy for how they are likely to behave through the buying process.

There is certainly no better way of conducting due diligence than going in person to a development, or at least speaking with someone who has.

Louise Reynolds – Director, Property Venture. Louise runs her own company helping people, in a practical way, to buy property overseas: http://property-venture.com

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Explore Morocco’s Cultural Etiquette

Whenever you travel abroad, it is important to know the rules of etiquette. A gesture can be a friendly greeting in several countries but a rude offense in others. Morocco, a country in North Africa, is not an exception. To enjoy your holiday in Morocco in the best way, you should explore its cultural etiquette in tems of language, dress, greetings and dining.

 

Language:

 

Moroccans primarily speak Arabic, specifically a Moroccan Arabic dialect. If you elect to go trekking in the mountains or in the Sahara Desert, you should expect Arabic to be the main language you hear. French is another common language of the country; however, it is spoken mostly in the northern region in places like the Rif Mountains, Algiers and Casablanca. Berber-Arabic can be found in the mountain and desert regions as well. English, Spanish and French are spoken and understood in cities such as Fez, Marrakesh and Casablanca. It would be polite for you to learn some conversational French before your trip.

 

Dress:

 

Morocco is mainly a Muslim country so your dress should reflect the cultural norm. Dressing in Muslim tunics is not appropriate for a foreigner; however, you should not wear skimpy shirts, shorts or skirts. Instead, you should wear modest clothing such as skirts that reach below the knees, light cotton pants and shirts that cover your shoulders. Beachwear is appropriate at tourist resorts along the Mediterranean and Atlantic coast, but not at local restaurants in these same areas.

 

Greetings:

 

Hospitality is key to the Moroccan culture. After introductions have been made, it is customary to ask about family or friends during a conversation. You can greet people with handshakes as long as they are the same gender. A “Western” handshake tends to be firm and enthusiastic, whereas in Morocco a gentler handshake is required. Women must offer their hand first if they wish to shake hands with a man. A Muslim woman, especially those in full veil tend to refrain from physical contact. In this situation a slight bow or head tilt of acknowledgment would be acceptable.

 

Public affection such as kissing and hugging is not tolerated in Morocco. To a certain degree hand holding is considered a platonic gesture and is not as taboo as other affectionate displays. Cultural etiquette also states that a woman, when young and unmarried, should travel with a group or be accompanied by a man, rather than going alone to a public place.

 

Dining Etiquette:

 

It is customary to be invited to a family home for a meal while in Morocco. If that is the case, you should not refuse any offer of food and graciously accept any present given to you when you are invited in. It is customary to bring a gift, such as flowers, sweets or pastries. In certain households, the men and women dine separately and require a more conservative dress code.

 

Sam Mitchell writes for Journey Beyond Travel, a one-stop shop for everything related to Morocco tours. From High Atlas treks to family vacations, Journey Beyond Travel offers everything you might need in a Morocco travel guide.

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